Entertainment

Mint Julep CD review: 'Modern folk at its finest'

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Listen, I’m not here to romanticize the art of drinking. In fact, one of my credos is “everything in moderation” and for the most part it works — unless I start consuming a tasty Mint Julep, which is a classy combo of mint leaves, sugar, water and bourbon. So... basically a whiskey mojito.

This is a southern drink, but I’m not too sure they’d really want to claim this one. Has anyone ever said, “Man... I was pretty loaded last night! I had six mint juleps, and it got pretty crazy. At one point I was going across the room, dipping my fingers in red wine, rubbing my fingers across strangers’ foreheads, saying ‘Simba!’?” If so, I really want to meet that person and watch The Lion King.

I’ve concluded the big appeal of a Mint Julep is that the mint makes it refreshing. What other drink can you slug down with the knowledge that your breath is 100 per cent kissable? It’s just being considerate to the person that you kiss next. I mean you’re really doing them a favour! Also, don’t worry about your smooches getting sloppy after having one or two of these because you know what a Mint Julep spells? Pure class.

So you could understand how my mind started racing when I found out that Jeremy Fisher’s acoustic driven new(ish) album is titled Mint Juleps.

A little back story on Fisher: he’s one of the worlds most underrated musicians. His wit and ability to turn a phrase is unlike any other. He’s accomplished one of the craziest tours you’ve heard of — travelling from Seattle to Halifax by bicycle. That’s 7,500 kilometres all while stopping to play shows with just his guitar. More importantly, he has a curly afro. Girls like running their fingers through it. Probably.

His lyrical wit is out in full force on “The Tetris Song.” Yes, he manages to write a sweet love song with a metaphor to one of the hardest video games ever created.

“Built to Last” has Fisher strumming about how life should be simpler and to embrace it: “I mix my time between work and play/sweet and sour make some good lemonade” — I’m sure he means a Mint Julep.

This album is modern folk at its finest. When I started listening to this album, I wasn’t too sure why Jeremy Fisher isn’t as big as he should be. Then I actually listened to it, and realized that this is right where he wants to be. He doesn’t want the crazy fame. He just wants to make the kind of music that he wants to make, and to keep it simple. Maybe while having some fun on the way.

Fisher is coming to Nelson on Valentine’s Day, which will make for one hell of a romantic show. Bring someone you can kiss, and for their sake order a Mint Julep.

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