Bo Shibari kyogen actors include Master (Mark Mealing) and drunken servants (Jessie Lay and Savanah Cockrell).

Celebrate Asian-Canadian heritage in Kaslo

Langham Cultural Centre presents Bo Shibari (“Tied to a Staff”), a traditional Japanese Kyōgen on Friday.

Celebrating the Asian Canadian Heritage Month of May, the Langham Cultural Centre presents Bo Shibari (“Tied to a Staff”), a traditional Japanese Kyōgen adapted by Mark Mealing and performed by two J.V. Humphries secondary school drama students, Jessie Lay and Savanah Cockrell, along with Mealing himself.

Kyōgen is a form of Japanese comic theatre recognized by UNESCO in 1991 as a masterpiece of oral world heritage. It is a fusion of dance, mime and acting with satirical humour and addresses worldly concerns of greed, vanity, and the pleasures of witty banter.

The play will be followed by an introduction to a Japanese tea ceremony and a pan-Asian dinner. In many Asian cultures food and tea are typically part of celebrations often shared with family, friends and neighbours and symbolize abundance, happiness, cohesiveness and peace.

You can also win a prize by participating in our “The Naming Contest” where you name notable Asian Canadians.

This celebration of our Asian cultures is made possible with funding from the Columbia Basin Trust through its Sponsorship Grant and many hours of volunteer work of the Langham Asian Canadian Heritage Month group.

Don’t miss the only Asian Canadian Heritage Month event in the Kootenays, happening Friday, May 24 at 6:30 p.m. at Langham Theatre (447 A Avenue) in Kaslo. Admission and dinner are free.