The Ministry of Forests is calling Duhamel Creek resident’s need to resort to direct action “unfortunate.”

Duhamel Creek training ‘unfortunate,’ says ministry

The Ministry of Forests is calling Duhamel Creek resident’s need to resort to direct action “unfortunate.”

The Ministry of Forests is calling Duhamel Creek resident’s need to resort to direct action “unfortunate.”

Some members of the community attended a workshop on the weekend that was held to provide non-violent strategies to those intending to continue pressure aimed at stopping logging in their watershed.

“It’s unfortunate that some local residents feel the need that they need to resort to direct action,” said ministry spokesperson Brennan Clarke.

“The Ministry does not condone any activities that support or promote the public in taking any unlawful actions that would interfere with legally approved activities on Crown lands.”

Clarke explains Kalesnikoff Lumber’s plans in the Duhamel Creek area recognize both water quality and soil stability objectives for operations.

“Under the Forest and Range Practices Act, 11 values, including water quality, need to be addressed in logging plans,” said Clarke. “The company conducted a terrain stability assessment to ensure that their logging was not in an area susceptible to slides.”

Residents said they feel pushed to pursue direct action because information hasn’t been forthcoming and regional district director Ron Mickel has said consultation has been lacking.

Clarke said that all legal requirements have been met. Kalesnikoff’s forest stewardship plan was advertised before submitting to the district manager for approval.

“We understand that Kalesnikoff also notified the Duhamel Creek water use group prior to starting their operations; and has also had several meetings with the group in response to their concerns,” said Clarke.

About a dozen people attended the non-violence training workshop.