Greg Nesteroff

This ca. 1950s photo was taken at Longbeach Service. The woman is unidentified

CPR renamed Hallets Landing as Longbeach

Longbeach, on Kootenay Lake’s West Arm, was formerly called 13 Mile and Halletts Landing.

This ca. 1950s photo was taken at Longbeach Service. The woman is unidentified
Kuskanax Creek at Nakusp has been so named since the 1860s or earlier

Is there a link between Kuskanax and Kuskonook?

Kuskonook (or Kuskanook) at the south end of Kootenay Lake sounds remarkably similar to Kuskanax, a creek at Nakusp.

Kuskanax Creek at Nakusp has been so named since the 1860s or earlier
The Porto Rico Hotel is seen in 1898. The building opened in 1897 under the management of Hank Noll

COLUMN: Porto Rico Hotel photo found

I came across an amazing old photo the other day: it shows the hotel at Porto Rico Siding in 1898.

The Porto Rico Hotel is seen in 1898. The building opened in 1897 under the management of Hank Noll
Neither father-and-son Charlie and Alan Wilson nor the Ministry of Highways could agree on the spelling of Kuskonook vs. Kuskanook. This clipping is from the Creston Valley Advance of Dec. 4

The eternal question: Kuskonook or Kuskanook?

Last week we began looking at the origin of Kuskonook, formerly known as Kalama, Armstrong’s Landing, and Goat River Landing.

Neither father-and-son Charlie and Alan Wilson nor the Ministry of Highways could agree on the spelling of Kuskonook vs. Kuskanook. This clipping is from the Creston Valley Advance of Dec. 4
This rare photo of Kuskonook in 1898 was only identified last year.

Kuskonook’s name full of intrigue

The naming of Kuskonook (or Kuskanook) is intriguing on so many levels that we’ll devote a few installments to it.

This rare photo of Kuskonook in 1898 was only identified last year.
Kootenay Bay was named in 1908 when the post office opened. Prior to that it was called Lynchville after John Lynch.

Kootenay Bay was formerly Lynchville

Kootenay Bay is the eastern terminal of the Kootenay Lake ferry (not Crawford Bay, as many people inexplicably believe).

Kootenay Bay was named in 1908 when the post office opened. Prior to that it was called Lynchville after John Lynch.
This photo by the Dominon Foto Co. of Nelson and Kaslo shows the Nelson Cafe in 1898 or 1899

COLUMN: Pioneer restaurateur’s story served up

Greg Nesteroff is on the trail again of Yahei Hoshi, who ran the Nelson Cafe in 1898-99.

This photo by the Dominon Foto Co. of Nelson and Kaslo shows the Nelson Cafe in 1898 or 1899
Aya Higashi in 2012.

Kaslo’s Aya Higashi passes at 96

Aya Higashi, the last remaining Kaslo resident interned there during the Second World War, has died.

Aya Higashi in 2012.
Greg Nesteroff

COLUMN: Life in an anti-bellwether riding

In politics, a bellwether riding is one that perpetually elects a member of government. We must be an anti-bellwether riding.

Greg Nesteroff
This sign helps perpetuate the memory of Koch Siding.

Koch Siding was home to sawmill, fruit ranching

While today most people consider Koch Siding part of Slocan Park, for a short while it was a distinct place.

This sign helps perpetuate the memory of Koch Siding.
The S.S. Kokanee

Kokanee’s name spread far and wide

In addition to being a fish and a popular beer, kokanee is the name of 14 geographic features in BC.

The S.S. Kokanee
The Sitkum fire

Incident team pulls back from Sitkum fire

The fire stands at 530 hectares and is 50 per cent contained as a specialist management team turns command back to local crews.

The Sitkum fire
Henry Richard Kitto (1867-1954)

Recalling Kitto’s Landing

Among the many lost landings on Kootenay Lake is Kitto (or Kitto’s, or Kittos), where Kokanee Creek Provincial Park is today.

Henry Richard Kitto (1867-1954)
The Sitkum/Duhamel fire as it looked a week ago. It is now considered 30 per cent contained

Sitkum fire 30% contained; Silverton fire 10%

Firefighters working the Sitkum/Duhamel fire enjoyed cooler temperatures but little rain over the weekend.

The Sitkum/Duhamel fire as it looked a week ago. It is now considered 30 per cent contained
Linnea Wagner enjoyed the facilities at Lions Park recently to cool off.

COLUMN: In search of Nelson’s hottest day

How far do you have to go back to find the warmest temperature in the city’s history?

Linnea Wagner enjoyed the facilities at Lions Park recently to cool off.
Incident commander Glen Burgess addresses a public meeting at the former A.I. Collinson school Wednesday evening on the Duhamel-Sitkum creek fire burning on the North Shore of Kootenay Lake.

Duhamel/Sitkum fire 20% contained

A 380-hectare fire burning on the North Shore of Kootenay Lake is about one-fifth contained, a public meeting heard Wednesday night.

Incident commander Glen Burgess addresses a public meeting at the former A.I. Collinson school Wednesday evening on the Duhamel-Sitkum creek fire burning on the North Shore of Kootenay Lake.
Kinnaird was incorporated as a village in 1948

Did Kinnaird come from Kinney, Kinnear, or Kinert?

Meet railway brakeman Frank Kinert. New information suggests he may be Kinnaird’s namesake.

Kinnaird was incorporated as a village in 1948
Arthur Fitzgerald Kinnaird

Castlegar’s mystery solved, but Kinnaird’s riddle endures

While the origin of Castlegar’s name has been definitively established, the jury’s still out on its former twin town of Kinnaird.

Arthur Fitzgerald Kinnaird
Lyle Kristiansen

UPDATED: Former MP Lyle Kristiansen dies

Kristiansen served as Kootenay West MP for eight years in the 1980s and 1990s.

Lyle Kristiansen
W.G. Cox drew this map of the Midway area in 1860

Boundary Creek marks spot where survey teams crossed

The Boundary is named after Boundary Creek, but why isn’t it named instead after the Kettle River?

W.G. Cox drew this map of the Midway area in 1860