The Porsche 911’s confidence-inspiring nature is what makes the car great.

The Porsche 911’s confidence-inspiring nature is what makes the car great.

2020 Porsche 911 4S

A seriously quick rear-engine marvel

If you could design the ultimate no-holds-barred sports car, it would likely include an exotic turbocharged engine positioned directly behind the cockpit, and an equally exotic-looking carbon-fibre body sprinkled with all kinds of flaps and wings.

In the real world, however, the comparatively humble Porsche 911 delivers the performance goods in a most understated way. Although it traces its rear-engine DNA back to Volkswagen Beetle originally created in the mid-1930s, the 911 nameplate celebrates its 55th anniversary in North America this year.

The latest 911 — code named 992 — covers a wide assortment of coupe and cabriolet (convertible) models.

Unless you’re an expert on the marque, it’s difficult to pinpoint the changes from one generation to the next. And that’s the case with the 2020 911, although upon closer inspection the hood’s leading edge has been squared-off and the air vents and oval headlights have been enlarged.

For the Carrera 4S, the “4” refers to all-wheel-drive and the “S” is a performance step up in power from the base 911: 443 horses versus 379.

For the Carrera 4S, the “4” refers to all-wheel-drive and the “S” is a performance step up in power from the base 911: 443 horses versus 379.

The rear fenders are noticeably wider, the engine vent has been reshaped and the taillight is now a thin ribbon that extends the entire width of the engine cover (as does the blacked-out exhaust panel below the bumper). The changes add a touch of elegance to the 911’s iconic shape.

In equal measure, the interior is a treat for the senses and remains accessible and comfortable for taller folks. Once aboard, the first thing you’ll notice, other than the contoured seats, is the elegantly styled dashboard and a floor console that now comes with a built-in cupholder. That’s a first for the 911, by the way.

There’s still some semblance of a rear seat in the 911, although anyone who has had the misfortune of occupying it can attest to its laughable legroom. Consider the 911 a two-seater. Fortunately, the seatback can be folded to create a handy parcel shelf.

The standard transmission is an eight-speed paddle-shift automatic. A seven-speed manual can be had for no additional discount. With the auto and launch control, Porsche claims a zero-to-100 km/h time of 3.4 seconds. Note the first-ever console cupholder for a 911. Photo: PORSCHE

The standard transmission is an eight-speed paddle-shift automatic. A seven-speed manual can be had for no additional discount. With the auto and launch control, Porsche claims a zero-to-100 km/h time of 3.4 seconds. Note the first-ever console cupholder for a 911. Photo: PORSCHE

Additional interior changes include the adoption of digital (instead of analog) gauges, and a 10.9-inch touch-screen that blends neatly into the dash instead of being awkwardly propped up on top.

For the all-wheel-drive Carrera 4S test car, inserting the key fob into the left side of the dash — it’s a Porsche thing — fires up a twin-turbocharged 3.0-litre horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine that puts out 443 horsepower and 390 pound-feet of peak torque. That’s 64 more horses than the base rear-wheel-drive 911 Carrera (and 59 more pound-feet), but a couple hundred less than the top 911 model.

A seven-speed manual transmission is available, however the 4S test car came with a paddle-shift eight-speed automatic. It’s a no-extra-cost perk, or you can look at the manual as a no-extra-discount option.

Zero-to-100 km/h happens in a Porsche-recorded 3.6 seconds, or 3.4 seconds using the launch control. In each case, the 4S’s AWD system transfers up to 40 per cent of the engine torque to the front wheels for added traction. This also helps out in winter driving conditions, if you feel so inclined.

Fuel economy with the automatic transmission is rated at 13.1 l/100 km in the city, 10.2 on the highway and 11.8 combined.

Piloting the 911 feels almost surreal. After a few minutes driving rapidly and cornering and stopping quickly, it feels completely natural. Instead of driving the car, you feel as though you’re wearing it. Like a tracksuit.

The 911’s confidence-inspiring nature is what makes the car great. It comes at a starting price of $141,000, including destination fees. The base two-wheel-drive 911 with 379 horsepower runs about $114,500.

From that point, the cost can get seriously out of hand if you select just a few of the available options. For example, the sure-stopping carbon-ceramic brakes add $9,000, the sport seats and carbon-fibre roof panel go for $4,000 each, and the incredible Burmester audio system adds $5,500. That’s just a smattering of a temping list.

For those who can afford it, the Porsche 911 Carrera 4S won’t disappoint and will definitely open your mind as what constitutes an exotic sports car.

What you should know: 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

Type: Rear-engine, all-wheel-drive sport coupe

Engine (h.p.): 3.0-litre DOHC horizontally opposed six-cylinder (443)

Transmission: Eight-speed dual-clutch automatic; seven-speed manual (opt.)

Market position: One of the most storied premium sports-car brands continues to refine and expand its model selection while maintaining the overall shape that has been a Porsche 911 hallmark for several decades.

Points: Subtle redesign manages to make a bolder statement. • Interior makeover is significantly more up to date. • Exceptional thrust from the turbo H-6 engine. • Limited assortment of active-safety tech. • Speedometer is almost impossible to view behind the steering wheel. • Expensive, especially after adding only a few options.

Driver assist: Blind-spot warning with cross-traffic backup alert (opt.); active cruise control (opt.); front and rear emergency braking (std.); inattentive-driver alert (n.a.); lane-departure warning (opt.); pedestrian detection (n.a.)

L/100 km (city/hwy) 13.1/10.2; Base price (incl. destination) $141,000

BY COMPARISON

Acura NSX

  • Base price: $192,900
  • Mid-engine AWD hybrid puts out 573 h.p. and 476 pound-feet of torque.

Nissan GT-R

  • Base price: $132,000
  • Front-engine AWD coupe’s twin-turbo V-6 delivers up to 600 horsepower.

Jaguar F-Type R coupe

  • Base price: $121,700
  • Updated 2021 model with a 575-h.p. supercharged V-8 makes a desirable choice.

-written by Malcom Gunn, Managing Partner at Wheelbase Media

If you’re interested in new or used vehicles, be sure to visit TodaysDrive.com to find your dream car today! Like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram

AutomotiveSports Cars

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

A man wearing a face mask to prevent the spread of COVID-19 walks past a mural in Vancouver on Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
212 new COVID-19 cases in Interior Health over the weekend

A total of 490 cases remain active; 15 in hospital

Jessica Ogden, who calls herself a water protector, not a protester, has lost an internal police complaint following several interactions with the RCMP and the legal system in 2019. Photo: Bill Metcalfe
Kootenay logging blockader loses police complaint, files counterclaim against company

Court actions and police complaints stem from blockades in the Balfour and Argenta areas in 2019

Nelson Amnesty is holding its annual Write for Rights campaign Dec. 12 at the Nelson Public Library. Photo: Submitted
Amnesty International Write for Rights relevant during the pandemic

Nelson Amnesty will host the annual event Dec. 12 at the Nelson Public Library

RNG plant
Construction on ground-breaking RNG plant in Fruitvale set to go in spring 2021

REN Energy partners with Calgary engineering firm for innovative West Kootenay gas plant

Katrine Conroy’s swearing in ceremony. Photo: Kootenay West Katrine Conroy Facebook
Forestry Minister West Kootenay MLA Katrine Conroy talks about her new role

Conroy will also oversee Columbia Basin Trust, Columbia Power Corporation and Columbia Basin Treaty

Seven Deers carved Shinning Raven Woman out of Labradorite harvested from the Canadian Shield. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Sculpture by Indigenous artist to be erected in Grand Forks

Civic leaders have rallied behind the project by Grand Forks’ David Seven Deers

Fossil finds at Mt. Stephen. (Photo: Sarah Fuller/Parks Canada)
Extreme hiking, time travel and science converge in the Burgess Shale

Climb high in the alpine and trace your family tree back millions of years – to our ocean ancestors

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Kettle bells sit aligned in an indoor fitness studio. (PIxabay.com)
1 COVID-19 case at a B.C. fitness studio leads to 104 more infections, 6 school exposures

According to case data released by Fraser Health, one case of the novel coronavirus carries a big impact

Vehicles drive past a display thanking essential workers in Burnaby, B.C. on Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
B.C. changing COVID-19 case reporting as virus spread continues

Manual counting takes more time, leads to errors

Black Press Media and BraveFace have come together to support children facing life-threatening conditions. Net proceeds from these washable, reusable, three-layer masks go to Make-A-Wish Foundation BC & Yukon.
Put on a BraveFace: Mask fundraiser helps make children’s wishes come true

From Black Press Media + BraveFace – adult, youth and kid masks support Make-A-Wish Foundation

Christy Jordan-Fenton is the co-author of the book Fatty Legs, which has been mentioned amid the controversy of an Abbotsford school assignment on residential schools.
Co-author of residential schools book condemns controversial Abbotsford class assignment

Children’s book mentioned amid controversy at W. A. Fraser Middle School

Kootenay East MLA Tom Shypitka takes over as energy and mines critic for the B.C. Liberal opposition. Kelowna-Lake Country MLA Norm Letnick (right) moves from health critic to assistant deputy speaker. (Hansard TV)
B.C. Liberals pick critics to take on Horgan’s NDP majority

Interim leader Shirley Bond takes seniors, long-term care

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland listens to a question from a reporter on the phone during a news conference in Ottawa, Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Spending too little worse than spending too much, Freeland says as Canada’s deficit tops $381B

‘The risk of providing too little support now outweighs that of providing too much’

Most Read