There are five operators to choose from

Cat Ski Capital of the World

With five cat-ski companies in the Nelson Kootenay Lake area, this is the place to be.

What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas, but what happens in the Nelson Kootenay Lake area you’ll want to share with your friends and family.

Skiing pillowy, deep powder where you carve fresh lines with each turn is something you’ll want to talk about. And even better, in the Nelson Kootenay Lake area there are five operators to choose from, making this area the Cat Ski Capital of the World, and it is in our backyard.

With five cat-ski companies in the Nelson Kootenay Lake area, including Baldface, Selkirk Wilderness, White Grizzly, Valhalla Powder Cats and Retallack  it has been verified that we have more cat-skiing, operators, terrain and snow than anywhere else in the world.

You can ski these powdery terrains December to April, and enjoy your private cat, decadent dining, and very comfortable accommodations right up at the lodges on the mountains or in the nearby towns.

The area offers:

•    97,000 acres of terrain

•    13 metres of snowfall annually

•    2,500 metre elevation at the peaks

•    14 cats daily – each holds up to 12 people (potentially serving about 2,000 people over 16 weeks)

•    terrain varies from open bowls to perfectly spaced trees, steep  powdery chutes, boulder gardens, uninterrupted fall lines and high peaks with glorious views

•    you will ski 12,000 to 20,000 vertical feet per day

•    accommodation is provided at four of the five: Baldface, Retallack, White Grizzly and Selkirk Wilderness Skiing.

•    Stay one to eight days, or longer if you choose – length of say varies with each cat ski company

•    Cat Skiing originated here at Selkirk Wilderness Skiing in 1975 by Allan and Brenda Drury

•    Warm up the legs a day or two before cat skiing at Whitewater Ski Resort (1184 acres) 20 minutes from Nelson.

•    Accommodation is available in Nelson, Ainsworth Hot Springs, Kaslo and Meadow Creek.

Each cat ski company has its own character offering delicious meals and comfortable accommodation. Read more about each place at www.nelsonkootenaylake.com/cat-ski-capital.  For more information contact Dianna Ducs, Executive Director of Nelson Kootenay Lake tourism at 250-352-7879 or email diannaducs@nelsonkootenaylake.com.

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