Released in 2019, Atlantis foretells the silent lingering trauma of an entire population yet to come after Ukraine has won the war. Photo: Submitted

Released in 2019, Atlantis foretells the silent lingering trauma of an entire population yet to come after Ukraine has won the war. Photo: Submitted

Civic Theatre to screen 2019 Ukrainian war movie May 4

Atlantis, directed by Valentyn Vasyanovych, looks ahead to a post-war Ukraine

Submitted by The Civic Theatre

The year is 2025 and Eastern Ukraine exists in the postwar aftermath of a full-scale border war against Russia. This is the setting of the remarkably prescient 2019 film Atlantis by Ukraine director Valentyn Vasyanovych.

In Vasyanovych’s imagined future, Ukraine won the war, yet the land for which they fought remains scorched, sterilized and riddled with land mines. The film’s protagonist, Sergiy, continues to train each day as if the war is still on, but sudden loss and joblessness force him to confront his crippling PTSD. He joins a humanitarian organization dedicated to exhuming and identifying the countless corpses buried in the scarred landscape.

Vasyanovych’s cinematographic aesthetic is stark, achingly silent and beautiful, creating a space for viewers to ruminate. If all that we see of the conflict documented in real time from the media and social posts provide the turbulent shock and noise of the current crisis, Atlantis foretells the silent lingering trauma of an entire population yet to come, when the cameras and attention have moved elsewhere.

Meant to be experienced in the most immersive way possible, this important and timely film is a must to be experienced in cinema.

The screening of Atlantis at The Civic Theatre on Wednesday, May 4 at 7 p.m. is a fundraiser screening with proceeds going to the Canadian Red Cross Ukraine Humanitarian Crisis Appeal.

Tickets are available at The Civic Theatre and online at civictheatre.ca.