Columbia Basin Trust’s Board. Back row (left to right): Rick Jensen

Columbia Basin Trust welcomes five new directors

Columbia Basin Trust welcomes five new members to its Board of Directors.

(Columbia Basin) – Columbia Basin Trust welcomes five new members to its Board of Directors and recognizes the contributions of the departing directors. It also wishes to acknowledge the reappointment of three current directors.

The new directors are:

• Larry Binks from Creston

(two-year term)

• John Dooley from Nelson

(three-year term)

• Loni Parker from Revelstoke

(two-year term)

• Vickie Thomas from ʔaq̓am

(two-year term)

• Jeanette Townsend from

Valemount (two-year term).

The three reappointed directors are:

• Wendy Booth from

Fairmont Hot Springs (three-year term)

• Gord DeRosa from Trail

(two-year term)

• Rick Jensen from Cranbrook

(three-year term), who is now

appointed Vice-Chair.

Also remaining on the Board are Chair Greg Deck from Radium, Laurie Page from Nakusp, Kim Deane from Rossland and Am Naqvi from Nelson.

Departing directors are:

• Denise Birdstone from Grasmere

• Cindy Gallinger from Elkford

• Andru McCracken from Valemount

• Paul Peterson from Burton

• David Raven from Revelstoke.

“We wish to welcome our new Board members and thank all departing members who have helped bring the Trust to our current position of strength,” said Greg Deck, Columbia Basin Trust Board Chair. “It’s not easy finding the right combination of skills and personal attributes that allows us effectively to serve residents and oversee our investments and delivery of benefits to our communities—and we’ve been lucky to benefit from such a team both in the past and moving forward.”

The Trust’s 12-member Board consists of qualified individuals appointed by the provincial government:

six from among the nominees of the five regional districts and the Ktunaxa Nation Council and six others. All directors must be residents of the Basin.

The Board meets throughout the year in communities around the Basin. The public is invited to attend in order to meet the directors and ask questions about the organization’s work in the Basin. The next public component is on Tuesday, March 31, in Fairmont Hot Springs.

For more information about the Board, and to read highlights and minutes from Board meetings, visit cbt.org/board.

Columbia Basin Trust supports efforts to deliver social, economic and environmental benefits to the residents of the Columbia Basin. To learn more about the Trust’s programs and initiatives, visit cbt.org or call 1.800.505.8998.

 

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