COLUMN: Dateline, 1918. Solar eclipse to rising water levels

Greg Scott: From the files of the Nelson Daily News

JUNE 1918

Dateline: June 10, 1918

Men, women, boys and girls were out on Saturday afternoon to view the eclipse of the sun which came as predicted and on scheduled time. Many persons had smoked glasses but some of the boys and girls used pieces of broken bottles. Shortly before 3 o’clock a twilight effect was noticeable and the right hand side of the sun became darkened. As the moon passed in front of the sun, clouds blew across the sky and for a time the eclipse was hidden from the view of many observers. Later, however, the eclipse was in view and it could be seen that the sun was hidden, all except a small portion at the top.

Dateline: June 13, 1918

Another rapid rise was noted in the water level of the lake when it came up nearly 10 inches from Tuesday noon until yesterday. During the previous 24 hours it rose eight inches. The hot weather of the past few days is bringing it up in rapid strides. With the heavy rains of last evening and the heat of the earlier part of the day it is possible that an even greater rise will be recorded today, it is stated. The lake has been nearly free of driftwood up to the present but yesterday several large logs were noticed to be coming down. The streams at the headwaters are reported to be swollen owing to the amount of snow which is being melted and the lake is rising accordingly. It is believed that a few more hot days will bring it up to the highest point in short order, but old timers state that the amount of snow in the hills does not warrant any record for height this season.

Dateline: June 17, 1918

Although carried far from their planned route of travel, nearly 1,000 unexpected visitors spent some time in the city Saturday and Sunday as a result of wash-outs on the C.P.R. main line. All main line passengers were carried around through the West Kootenay route. About 700 eastbound passengers and 300 westbound passengers passed through the city during the weekend. Five trains came from the west and two from the east. The passengers were transferred from Nelson to Kootenay Landing on the steamers Nasookin and Kuskanook. The equipment was taken from Proctor to Kootenay Landing by barge. The last train is scheduled to leave Nelson at 6:30 this morning, so it is assumed that the traffic on the mainline is reestablished. Passengers commended the Nelson-Kettle Valley service and complemented those in charge on the remarkable way in which the large number of passengers was handled.

Dateline: June 18, 1918

Nelson and District’s Red Cross campaign was launched last evening when a mammoth parade and mass meeting featured the opening of a campaign of which the call is “Give till your heart says stop.” Hundreds of citizens thronged the streets for nearly an hour before the parade finally assembled at The Daily News at 8 pm and proceeded down Baker Street headed by the mayor in his car. The parading cars, containing local dignitaries, were impressively decorated with the Red Cross emblem and nearly every allied nation was represented in the flags which waved from all the machines. One auto, which attracted much interest, represented a first aid dressing station, a wounded soldier lying on a stretcher among piled up sandbags, a Tommy and an Anzac keeping guard. Later, at the Opera House, prior to the speeches, an orchestra gave its services free for the evening. The stage was decorated with flags and Red Crosses. The junior members of the Red Cross Society acted as ushers. (Ed. note- at the close of the campaign the drive raised $906.80 in donations and $337.50 from life memberships. There were 969 subscribers with an average donation of $2.25 – $35 in 2018 $)

Dateline: June 21, 1918

From 7 0’clock in the morning till 10 o’clock in the evening tomorrow all registration places in Nelson and throughout the Kootenay will be open for the purposes of the signing of cards and certificates of all residents in Canada, of all persons of both sexes and all nationalities aged 16 years and over. All residents in Canada over 16 years of age must obtain certificates, and must hereafter exhibit them whenever called upon to do so. There is no limit above 16, it is emphasized. National registration is compulsory, there is no choice in the matter and heavy penalties apply for non registration by the time the registration booths close. The public is also warned that any person dealing with unregistered persons are liable to the same penalties as are fixed for non-registration.

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