COLUMN: Dim-out regulations lifted

Dim-out regulations which have smothered the bright lights of BC coast cities for almost a year will be lifted – November 1, 1943.

By Greg Scott

 

Dateline:

November 1, 1943

Dim-out regulations which have smothered the bright lights of British Columbia coast cities for almost a year will be officially lifted as of midnight tonight. Dim-out regulations are also lifted in the Kootenays at the same time. In Nelson, the easing of restrictions on outside lighting was announced by the Civilian Protection Committee. Business places could use signs and other outside lighting provided someone was on the premises who would be able to turn it out in the event of an air raid alarm.

Porch lights, provided they were not stronger than 26 watts, could be used on residences under the same conditions. There must be someone on hand to turn them off if necessary.

 

Dateline:

November 1, 1943

Stained and torn, the former battle ensign of the Canadian Destroyer St. Croix was greeted with a roar of applause Saturday night when Lieutenant Eric Johnson R.C.N.V.R. displayed it in a stirring climax to his address at the Civic Theatre. Lt. Johnson is in the Southern Interior to assist in the drive for the Kootenay-Boundary to replace the St. Croix, torpedoed recently in mid-Atlantic while defending a convoy. Only one man of the 147 aboard survived. This week Kootenay-Boundary is engaged in an all-out campaign to attain its Victory Loan quota of $2,725,000- approximately the cost of a destroyer. (Note: $38,862,362 in 2013 dollars)

 

Dateline:

November 1, 1943

That the Kootenay Lake Trout Derby for 1943 was nearing its climax was brought home forcibly to Halloween crowds on Baker Street Saturday night when Nelson Gyros staged a “derby” in the midst of traffic. Coming in the midst of the youngsters’ Halloween pageantry it was an unheralded but outstanding publicity boost for the derby. Two Gyro “fisherman,” riding in an outboard-powered boat aboard a trailer, were drawn along the street, while a “school” of trout followed on behind, teasing the fishermen by being almost caught and then getting away. Roman candles and other fireworks and the noise of the outboard, plus the antics of the fisherman and fish, stopped traffic.

 

Dateline:

November 9, 1943

One dairy which on a second test had slightly contaminated milk, and which was a grade B dairy, has been ordered to cease selling raw milk in Nelson. Another with moderate contamination is now pasteurizing. Two others with very slight contamination have been instructed to observe special cleanliness and this advice if scrupulously followed, will rectify faults. Other dairies were meeting required standing. Dr. R.B. Brummitt, Medical Health Officer, thus summarized the raw milk situation in Nelson, describing it as “greatly improved.” The City of Nelson lacked the power to require pasteurization of all raw milk sold in the city but he still recommended pasteurization for “by this means, and this means alone, can a safe milk supply be assured.”

 

Dateline:

November 20, 1943

Sgt. Raymond C. Burgess of Nelson has paid the supreme sacrifice. Cabled advice that he was “killed in action overseas November 16” was received Friday morning by his wife, the former Miss Deanie Wallace and his parents, Mr. and and Mrs. J. Burgess, at Nelson. The 23-year-old Canadian Bomber Group pilot would have completed an operating tour, generally of about 30 flights over enemy targets in early December, when he would have been eligible for an instructional tour, and then possibly a leave in Canada. His parents learned only recently that he had been recommended for a commission, earned in just over a year of overseas duty. Sgt. Burgess, a highly regarded member among Nelson young people and in sport, went overseas just six months after his marriage and was an employee in the Nelson Daily News composing room for four years before his call-up. He is also survived by his baby son, Raymond Arthur.

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