Endangered Leatherback Turtle spotted near Vancouver Island

The rare moment was captured by Jeremy Koreski and former Vancouver Canucks defenceman Willie Mitchell

Tofino photographer Jeremy Koreski and former Vancouver Canucks defenceman and co-owner of Tofino Resort and Marina, Willie Mitchell, went fishing for some tuna the other day and returned with one tell-all turtle story.

The fishing buddies and business colleagues say they spotted an endangered Leatherback Turtle near Loudon Canyon in the Barkley Sound. Koreski managed to snap a photo of the marine creature just before it dove under.

“We were probably 30 miles straight out,” said Koreski. “I didn’t realize that [the turtle] was so rare. I guess the last sighting was two years ago and then the only other sighting was two years before that.”

“I wish we had a little bit more time with the turtle. We kind of spotted it and drove up to it and it was taking a few breaths than it dove down.”

VIDEO: Ex-Canuck Willie Mitchell spots rare salmon shark

This isn’t the first time Koreski and Mitchell have experienced a rare sighting on the water. In the fall of 2017, they claim they saw a salmon shark while cruising around the Clayoquot Canyon.

A website dedicated to Leatherbacks in B.C. describes the turtles as some of the biggest reptiles in the world, and have been around since the dawn of dinosaurs.

However, there have been less than 135 Leatherbacks documented off the Coast of B.C. since the 1930s.

The giant turtles migrate all the way from Indonesia to feed on the jellyfish in North Pacific waters. They have most often been sighted between June and October when jellyfish populations are likely to be greatest.

READ: Pet tortoise returns after nine months on the lam in Ucluelet

Threats to the survival of this endangered turtle include: entanglement in fishing gear, collision with boats, and plastic pollution. In a global study of 408 Leatherback Turtles called ‘Leatherback Turtles: The menace of plastic’ by Mrosvosky, autopsy records showed more than 30 per cent had plastics in their intestines.

Sea turtles accidentally eat plastic bags because they cannot tell them apart from their jellyfish prey.

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

leatherback turtleTofino MarinaturtleWillie Mitchell

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Jeremy Koreski and Willie Mitchell spotted this Leatherback Turtle on a recent fishing trip near Tofino. (Jeremy Koreski Photo)

Just Posted

Fire damages Harrop nursery

The cause of the blaze is under investigation

LETTER: Time to re-purpose airstrip

From reader John Bowden

Nelson Innovation Centre to host pitch competition

Deadline to apply for the first of three events is Sept. 24

School bus registration now open in SD8

Registration deadline is Sept. 4

BUSINESS BUZZ: COVID and cash, ATCO’s Weatherford heads Selkirk board, and more

Darren Davidson brings us the latest goings-on in the local business world

‘Don’t kill my mom’: Ryan Reynolds calls on young British Columbians to be COVID-smart

‘Deadpool’ celebrity responds to premier’s call for social influence support

Widow of slain Red Deer doctor thanks community for support ahead of vigil

Fellow doctors, members of the public will gather for a physically-distanced vigil in central Alberta

Protesters showcase massive old yellow cedar as Port Renfrew area forest blockade continues

9.5-foot-wide yellow cedar measured by Ancient Forest Alliance campaigners in Fairy Creek watershed

Taking dog feces and a jackhammer to neighbourhood dispute costs B.C. man $16,000

‘Pellegrin’s actions were motivated by malice …a vindictive, pointless, dangerous and unlawful act’

Racist stickers at Keremeos pub leaves group uneasy and angry

The ‘OK’ hand gesture is a known hate-symbol

VIDEO: World responds to B.C. girl after pandemic cancels birthday party

Dozens of cards and numerous packages were delivered to six-year-old Charlie Manning

Expected fall peak of COVID-19 in Canada could overwhelm health systems: Tam

National modelling projections released Friday show an expected peak in cases this fall

Hundreds of sea lions to be killed on Columbia River in effort to save endangered fish

Nearly 22,000 comments received during public review were opposed, fewer than 200 were for

B.C.’s fuel suppliers to publish prices to provide accountability: minister

Bruce Ralston says move will ensure industry publicly accountable for unexplained prices increases

Most Read