Lots of exclamation marks at Nelson Library!

It’s hard to fathom, sometimes, why kids can’t just mow the lawn and then kick back on the deck like the rest of us.

My kids are pretty good at occupying themselves through the sultry days of summer, and I haven’t heard “Mom — I’m bored. What can I do?” for at least 15 years. But I remember it like it was yesterday.

It’s hard to fathom, sometimes, why kids can’t just mow the lawn and then kick back on the deck like the rest of us. But the truth is, young minds need to be engaged. Beach days get old when the sun shines day after day — and if it doesn’t? Our soggy June meant that this past Monday, when registration opened for the Library’s Summer Reading Club, bouncing youngsters and their glassy-eyed parents were lining up for the signup.

Summer reading clubs have been around as a provincial thing since the 1990s, but libraries have been entertaining our kids through summer programming for a lot longer than that. Themes — those things from which children’s librarians leap into creative frenzy — have included “Wild about Books!”, “Anything can happen when you Read!”, “UnderCover Reader!”, “Extreme Reading!” and “Catch the Reading Bug!”

It’s exciting!! And there are always lots of exclamation points!!!

Until this year.

For 2012, the theme is the mysterious “Strange…but True?” which offers great scope for offerings on programs surrounding magic, talking trees and if featured illustrator Mike Deas’s fabulous renderings are any indication, perhaps an alien or a sasquatch thrown in for good measure. Librarians and Summer Reading Club student workers can be a little odd, too — but in a good way, it’s true.

Here’s the strange but true story of goings-on for our younger growing concerns this summer.

Registration for the Summer Reading Camp, Summer Reading Club or Grow-a-Reader is available at the Library Monday — Thursday, 10 a.m.  to 5:30 p.m. and Friday 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Summer Reading Camps and activity days are fun-themed days for age groups including three to five-year-olds, six to eight-year-olds, and nine to 11-year-olds that include stories, games, crafts, experiments, and more. Wildcard Wednesdays are always exciting, including special events and field trips, and they’re for any small thing under 12 years old.

The Summer Reading Club involves — strange for a library, but true! — reading! Kids take the log home, record the books they’ve read and bring it back to be entered in draws for cool prizes.

The Grow-a-Reader Program is like the Summer Reading Club but for 3 to 5 year olds. For every 15 minutes kids are read to, they can colour one of the badges in the special log book. When it’s full, they can bring it to the library to be entered in a draw for a prize.

There are a couple of special events coming up: The July 4 SRC kickoff party features children’s author Darcee O’Hearn. Her newest book, Leonard the Larch, takes young readers on a forest jaunt with a talking tree. Strange… but true! Darcee’s presentation is made possible by the Arthur P. Campbell project.

More magic occurs on July 16 when Norden the Magician takes his sleight-of-hand to strangely hilarious places. Norden was voted the 2012 KIDabra entertainer of the year. Both events are free, fun, and sure to keep young minds engaged.

Will the sun shine again? Hard to say. But at the library, there are good things happening — with lots of exclamation points!! — all summer long.

 

Anne DeGrace’s library column is featured in the Star every second Friday

 

Just Posted

National trail group decries province’s plans for West Kootenay trail

Converting trail back to motorized use will harm its international reputation, says official

Cannings to pedal through South Okanagan — West Kootenay riding

MP leaves from Nakusp on Aug. 23 and ends in Kaleden on Aug. 29.

West Kootenay Open returns to new Nelson Tennis Club

The tournament runs Friday to Sunday

PHOTOS: Nelson mural festival: ‘a huge act of community’

This year the mural festival became a music festival as well

VIDEO: Title of 25th Bond movie is ‘No Time to Die’

The film is set to be released in April 2020

New study suggests autism overdiagnosed: Canadian expert

Laurent Mottron: ‘Autistic people we test now are less and less different than typical people’

B.C. father tells judge he did not kill his young daughters

Andrew Berry pleaded not guilty to the December 2017 deaths

Trans Mountain gives contractors 30 days to get workers, supplies ready for pipeline

Crown corporation believes the expansion project could be in service by mid-2022

Rosemount cooked diced chicken linked to listeria case in B.C.

The symptoms of listeria include vomiting, nausea, fever, muscle aches

B.C. seniors allowed more choice to stay in assisted living

Province doesn’t need to wait for a complaint to investigate care, Adrian Dix says

Retired B.C. fisherman wins record $60M Lotto Max jackpot

Joseph Katalinic won the biggest Lotto Max prize ever awarded

New ‘Matrix’ film set with Keanu Reeves and Lana Wachowski

Fourth installment to feature Reeves as Neo and Carrie-Anne Moss as Trinity

Most Read