The world’s cocoa industry often exploits children in West Africa who are subjected to terrible conditions.

Make this Halloween in Nelson one where free trade gets a treat

The cocoa farmers are often taken advantage of due to their lack of knowledge and resources.

Over half of the world’s cocoa is produced in West Africa, yet many of the communities involved with conventional cocoa production see very little of the profit associated with it in North America. The cocoa farmers are often taken advantage of due to their lack of knowledge and resources.

In addition to heavy pesticide use, UNICEF has documented the use of child labour — in the worst cases using trafficked children who are paid little to no wages, work in dangerous conditions, and have never tasted chocolate.

Your purchasing choices have the power to change the world. Fair trade, organic chocolate is sourced directly from small farmer co-ops, who are paid a minimum price, do not use slave labour, and follow environmental standards.

Help make life sweeter for kids around the world this year. Give out a more ethical treat, raise awareness about production practices behind conventional chocolate, and encourage conscious consumerism.

A limited number of Fair Trade Halloween kits, containing 25 mini fair trade, organic Camino chocolates and informational flyers, are available for $8 and can be ordered by emailing fairtradehalloween@gmail.com or calling Jen at 250-551-8343.

The chocolates have been donated by La Siembra, a Canadian cooperative, and all profits will benefit the Nelson Food Cupboard.  The chocolates are produced and packaged in Peru, further supporting the local communities of family farmers.

Fair trade chocolate is also available at the Kootenay Co-op and other local grocery stores. Other ideas for alternative treats include fair trade teas and art supplies. For more information on fair trade, visit fairtrade.ca and check out the educational toolkit at lasiembra.com/camino/en/educational-tools.

 

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