Nelson air cadet squadron receives annual review

Last Wednesday, 561 Nelson Osprey Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Cadets held its 64th annual ceremonial review.

Nelson air cadet squadron receives annual review



Last week, 561 Nelson Osprey Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Cadets held its 64th annual ceremonial review. The cadets were led by Warrant Officer Second Class Andrew Pfeffer as they were inspected by Nelson fire Chief Len MacCharles.

Also in attendance where Nelson Mayor Deb Kozak, Nelson police Chief Paul Burkart, Keith Kempe from the Air Cadet League of BC, Doug Wood representing the Nelson Legion, members of the Eagles Club, IODE, CIBC Wood Gundy and officers and cadets from other local Squadrons.

During the night, members of the IODE Kokanee Chapter donated $1,000 to the Squadron. This is their second donation for the year and brought their total donation to $2,000.

Also, CIBC Woody Gundy donated $1,000 to the squadron and Royal Canadian Legion Poppy Fund donated $1,500.

Many cadets also received awards:

Lord Strathcona Medal and Ethan White Award: Sgt. Jasper Taylor

Top First Year Cadet and Voluntary Committment: LAC Carson Van Horne

Top Athlete and Best Drill: F/Cpl. Ben Hradil-Kasseckert

Top Aviation Cadet: Sgt. Keagan Jade

Best Shot: LAC Nicola Anderson

Best Attendance and Voluntary Commitment: Cpl. Brayden Markin-Hellekson

Cadets in Level 3, 4 and 5 also were given certificates that will let them claim high school credits they receive for their cadet work. On successful completion of Level 3, cadets receive four Grade 10 credits, Level 4 cadets receive four Grade 11 credits and Level 5 cadets receive four Grade 12 credits

A presentation was also made to Lt. John Restemeyer, who after a year as commanding officer is leaving the area.

The annual ceremonial review marks the completion of the 2015-16 training year for 561 Squadron. However, several cadets will be attending summer training in Vernon and Victoria. The 2016-17 training year starts Sept. 7.

Activities planned for the next training year include flying in both gliders and powered aircraft, orienteering, public speaking, first aide, air rifle shooting, sports and outdoor survival.

The Royal Canadian Air Cadets, in partnership with the Air Cadet League of Canada and the Department of National Defence has been training youth in Canada for over 75 years. While the program is military based, there is no obligation for a cadet to join the Canadian Armed Forces.