Nelson resident Joan Posivy's book about youth empowerment will be released online on Wednesday

Nelson author launches book on youth success

Joan Posivy has spent decades teaching audiences the basic principles of success.

Nelson author Joan Posivy is releasing a new book today timed to coincide with United Nations International Youth Day on August 12.

In The Way Success Works, Posivy has collected stories of youth achievement around the world and tied them to her three-part formula for success.

“It’s a set of principles on how to build the best life,” she says, and it’s part of her new Global Youth Project.

Posivy has years of experience as a motivational speaker in several countries and has always been attracted to youth audiences.

“It is the perfect age when they have their whole life in front of them but they are their own decision makers now,” she says. “But not all of them have been offered a set of ideas that help them get where they want to go.”

That’s what she hopes How Success Works will do. The book sets out a system of developing a goal and allowing yourself to believe in it. The next step is to start and the book gives directions on how to do that.

“It is the start that stops most people,” she said. We wait and procrastinate, thinking we should be able to visualize the end result before we actually start. Instead, she says, we should take the advice of Martin Luther King: “Faith is taking the first step, even if you can’t yet see the whole staircase.”

The book’s practical advice is interspersed with stories about young people around the world who have accomplished extraordinary things, like Deep, a young man in India who developed an online platform on which people can register their name and blood type to be called if their blood is needed, in a country plagued by chronic blood shortages. His system is now being adopted across the country.

Or like Rachel, a young woman from Ontario who developed a marker with which you can draw an invisible picture on your skin before you apply sunscreen. Invisible, that is, until your sunscreen starts to wear off, and then your drawing becomes gradually visible. It’s currently in the regulatory testing stage and has been profiled on CBC television.

Another example is a local one. Posivy profiles Nick Waggoner, a Nelson adventurer and film-maker who heads Sweetgrass Productions.

The Way Success Works can be viewed or purchased online at thewaysuccessworks.com.

Just Posted

Nelson considers amnesty on parking fines

Drivers with backlogged fines would have until January to apply

EDITORIAL: Federal NDP challenges evident on Kootenay campaign trip

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh tours the Kootenays in support of local MPs, proportional representation

Columbia Basin Trust announces grant for technology upgrades

The deadline for organizations to apply is Dec. 17

Leafs fall to Braves, Twitter fight breaks out

Nelson gave up two goals in the third en route to a 4-2 loss

Cardiac arrest survivor saved by passerby

People who know CPR can now register with a new phone app to notify them of nearby emergencies

VIDEO: B.C. legislature clerk, sergeant at arms suspended for criminal investigation

Clerk of the House Craig James, Sergeant-at-arms Gary Lenz on administrative leave

Former NHL player and coach Dan Maloney dies at 68

Maloney coached the Toronto Maple Leafs and Winnipeg Jets

Ex-MSU president charged with lying to police about Nassar

Lou Anna Simon was charged Tuesday with lying to police during an investigation

Police aim to prevent retaliation after Hells Angel found dead under B.C. bridge

IHIT confirms Chad Wilson, 43, was the victim of a ‘targeted’ homicide

Otter makes a snack out of koi fish in Vancouver Chinese garden

Staff say the otter has eaten at least five fish

Police looking into two more incidents at private Toronto all-boys’ school

Police and the school have said two of the prior incidents involved an alleged sexual assault

B.C. lumber mills struggle with shortage of logs, price slump

Signs of recovery after U.S. market swings, industry executive says

25% of Canadians still won’t say they use pot, survey says

Statistics Canada poll says Canadians on average were 18.9 years old when they first tried pot.

Kootenay music mentor crushed by stolen sax, sheet music

Anyone with information is urged to call Crime Stoppers or the Trail RCMP at 250.364.2566

Most Read