Nelson celebrates Restorative Justice Week

A free, educational, interactive event will be held at the Nelson Public Library on Thursday, Nov. 19 from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

This year the Nelson Police Department restorative justice program celebrates Restorative Justice Week by hosting a free, educational, interactive event at the Nelson Public Library on Thursday, Nov. 19 from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

Correction Services Canada’s restorative justice division proclaims the third week in November to focus on the important work being done by restorative justice programs in communities across Canada.

A non-adversarial, non-retributive approach to justice that views crime and conflict as harm done to people and relationships,restorative justice is a philosophy that emphasizes healing in victims, accountability of offenders, and the involvement of citizens.

Upon taking up his position in 2011, Nelson Police Chief Wayne Holland made the establishment of a restorative justice program a top priority. Gerry Sobie, a volunteer restorative justice consultant and trainer, along with Nelson PoliceDepartment’s community policing officer, Sgt. Dino Falcone, worked to make that vision a reality, and the Nelson PoliceDepartment restorative justice program was launched in April 2014.

After four months of training, volunteers have taken on files involving such crimes as theft, assault, mischief, and break and enter. They are acquiring and refining the skills required to handle complex files and emotionally challenging situations. At present, 15 trained volunteers from a cross-section of the community, with backgrounds in education, technology, trades and business, have successfully completed 22 files, with three files in progress.

The program’s volunteer restorative justice practitioners bring together those who have been affected by crime, those who are responsible for the harm, their respective supporters and other stakeholders into a conference designed to empower all participants to share their experience and explore ways to repair the harm. A resolution agreement is carefully drafted based on the collaborative efforts of all participants.

Through restorative justice, a unique understanding about harm and its effects is reached between the responsible person and the affected person. Where the criminal justice system promotes a win-lose outcome with charges, pleas and court, the restorative justice model promotes win-win outcomes with those involved making decisions about how the harm can be repaired.

The evening will be a valuable experience for people with any level of knowledge. Refreshments will be provided.

 

Just Posted

Four-storey development slated for Hall-Front intersection in Nelson

Building will be mixed commercial and residential

Wildflower School to keep its bee hive

City council voted to give the school a bylaw exemption

Nearby wildfire closes Idaho Peak

The popular hiking spot is off limits to the public

Granite Pointe’s GM honoured among world’s top golf teachers

David Belling has been included on a top-100 list

VIDEO: Nelson Leafs prepare for new season with training camp

Forty-seven players hit the ice last weekend

VIDEO: Monday Roundup: Aug. 13, 2018

The Nelson Star’s weekly news roundup

Victoria police say explicit calls continue to target women

Over 50 reports of unwanted, sexually explicit calls have come in

‘It’s like a party in your mouth’

B.C. creator’s Milkshake Burger makes its debut at the PNE

Darkwoods Conservation is closed to all public road access due to wildfires

Boat access to Tye along the shore of Kootenay Lake is still permitted.

Get involved in the Great Canadian Bumble Bee Count

Environmental organization develops app to help with the nationwide count

Pesticides linked to bee deaths will be phased out in Canada, sources say

Neonicotinoids, or neonics, are a class of pesticides used by farmers and hobby gardeners alike

Wildfire smoke blankets B.C. and Alberta, prompting air quality advisories

About 25 new wildfires were sparked between Monday morning and midday Tuesday

Big bucks for painting of small B.C. town

A 1965 painting of Ashcroft by E. J. Hughes exceeded its pre-auction estimate at a recent sale.

Most Read