(L-R) Students Genny Beaudoin

Nelson students prepare minds for an incredible journey

A couple of years ago, Mike worked for a few weeks in Fort McPherson with his son Ryan, who was teaching at Chief Julius School at the time.

BY EMILY HOFF

“Seek first to understand.” These are the words of Mike McIndoe, a former principal of L.V. Rogers.

A couple of years ago, Mike worked for a few weeks in Fort McPherson with his son Ryan, who was teaching at Chief Julius School at the time. Mike helped out the students, and got to know the community and their culture.

This March, Mike came to one of our weekly North/South Exchange meetings in the hope of broadening our minds of Fort McPherson. He came into the classroom, grabbed a pen and wrote the poetic words that have been stuck in my head to this day: “Seek first to understand.”

I know what this means. I know that a head full of experience is clearer than a head full of ignorance and shadow. But as Mike started to talk about his weeks in this small northern town, I began to realize what I would see when our charter plane landed in Fort McPherson.

For all of us, having the students come to Nelson was an experience of a life time. I couldn’t wait until I got to talk to them, got to see what they like and what they do.

Since their departure, I haven’t thought about taking that first breathtaking step into their town. Now as March whizzes past my face, I think about how different it will be for us up there.

Mike began with an introduction into Fort McPherson. He showed us a slideshow of the landscape and the surrounding area. When he got onto the topic of Chief Julius School, he said that he was taken aback by the attitude of the students.

Many students filtered into their classes by midday. He couldn’t grasp their attention.

Mike told us that he had assumed many things by just walking into the school. He assumed these things before he searched for answers. Mike told his story to warn that it will happen to us too. Every human judges and assumes by what they see. They relate what they see to past experiences. But we must explore these unknown territories. We must search for new openings and clear our thoughts and feelings that come crashing into us like an angry tidal wave as we enter Fort McPherson. Clear them to make room for new feelings.

Thanks to Mike, we have an idea of what it will look like up there.

Now, our group is starting to prepare. We have made packing lists as well as a safety list.

The whole group is building in excitement. Our excitement will soon make way for enlightenment and a new perspective on life. Soon we will meet the students’ families, see their homes and their way of life.

Soon we will enter Fort McPherson. When we return, we will be changed forever.

 

Emily Hoff is a Grade 9 L.V. Rogers student who is part of the exchange to Fort McPherson

 

Just Posted

Selkirk College students protest proposed tuition increases

Sudents’ union says this year’s 2 per cent increase puts education out of reach for some

Nelson project funds rural schools in Nepal

Mountain trekker David Swain runs the Altitude Project

Trail area homicide investigation continues

Jan. 14 marked one year since Jordan Workman was discovered in the trunk of a burnt car

Leafs, Nitehawks settle for 4-4 tie

Nelson is now unbeaten in nine straight games

Former ski champ and MLA’s son hope to open Castlegar cannabis store next month

Felix Belczyk and Ben Conroy are in the approval process for local Spiritleaf outlet

UPDATE: B.C. legislature managers accused of excessive travel, personal expense claims

Clerk Craig James, security chief Gary Lenz call allegations ‘completely false’

B.C. man fined $10,000 after leaving moose to suffer before death

Surrey man was convicted last week on three Wildlife Act charges

‘Blue Monday’ isn’t real, but depression can be

CMHA encourages people to prioritize their mental health

Anti-pipeline group wants NEB to consider impact of emissions, climate change

Stand.earth filed NEB motion asking to apply same standard to the project as it did with Energy East pipeline

B.C. man charged in 2014 snake venom death of toddler

Henry Thomas was taking care of the North Vancouver girl the day before she died

Parole granted for drunk driver who killed B.C. RCMP officer

Kenneth Jacob Fenton will be able to attend alcohol abuse treatment, nearly three years after crash that killed Const. Sarah Beckett

B.C.’s largest public-sector union wants inquiry into money laundering, drugs

Union officials say Premier John Horgan and Attorney General David Eby have not ruled out the possibility of a public inquiry

Teen in confrontation with Native American: I didn’t provoke

Nick Sandmann of Covington Catholic High School said he was trying to defuse the situation

New military armoury opens in Cranbrook

Military presence in the Key City a part of the 44th Engineer Squadron

Most Read