PLACE NAMES: Pilot Bay

When James White of the Geographic Survey of Canada inquired about how Pilot Bay got its name, he received an intriguing reply.

The Pilot Bay lighthouse



One hundred fiftieth in an alphabetical series on West Kootenay/Boundary place names

When James White of the Geographic Survey of Canada inquired about how Pilot Bay on Kootenay Lake got its name, he received an intriguing reply from J.W. Cockle of the Kaslo Board of Trade, dated Aug. 26, 1905:

“This is a later corruption of Pirates Bay, by which name it was known to the earlier settlers. The derivation of the name Pirates is from the Kootenay Indians who called it Yakhsoumah, or Thief’s Bay. In early days the Kootenays and Colville Indians were at war. The Colvilles in one of their raids succeeded in stealing (whilst the Kootenays slept) all of their canoes. These they towed or paddled down the lake for a distance of 30 miles and cached them in the secure refuge of what was subsequently called Thief’s Bay.”

Although no other ethnographic source recorded it as the original name of Pilot Bay, yaqsuʔmiǂ is in fact the Ktunaxa word for canoe, specifically the sturgeon nose canoe. The bit about Thief’s Bay or Pirates Bay, however, is probably a misremembered joke, as we’ll see shortly.

The earliest reference to Pilot Bay is in a legal ad dated June 30, 1890 and published six days later in the Nelson Miner by the Sayward-Davies Lumber Co., applying to buy a sawmill site.

A pilot is an expert ship handler who maneuvers a ship through dangerous or congested waters. According to East Shore historian Susan Hulland, “Pilot Bay is the most protected harbour on the whole of Kootenay Lake. It was a place where the boat pilots ran for cover from bad weather. The area near the Outlet is one of the stormiest parts of the lake — the winds often meet there. I think the name came from people who were navigating.”

A townsite was planned at Pilot Bay. The Hot Springs News of Jan. 27, 1892 said “The promoters … intended calling the town Galena, but on making inquiries they found that there was already a post office in the province by that name. Why not call it Hendryx? Certainly the Hendryx family have put into the Kootenay Lake country as many hard licks and good dollars as some other families who have towns named after them. Call the new town Hendryx by all means.”

(Hendryx was already the name of the camp at the Bluebell mine, today known as Riondel. We’ll get to it later in this series.)

The Spokane Review of March 29, 1892 noted: “Thirty-two miles away, and almost lost to view, can be seen on the promontory at Pilot bay on which Galena City is being built …”

On June 19, the same newspaper carried the dateline “Pilot Bay, BC, June 17 – The town of Galena, with its large force of men … presents quite an animated appearance …”

However, when Charles E. Perry surveyed the townsite on Nov. 30, 1892, it was called Pilot Bay. The streets were named Columbia, Davies, Hendryx, and Sayward, plus 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th. The plan was cancelled in 1962; none of the original street names survive.

The name Galena stuck around on Kootenay Lake: it is the bay closest to the Bluebell.

While there is no indication Thief’s Bay was ever used, Pirate Bay did appear in the Nelson Miner of Aug. 16, 1890: “For several years past rich float galena has been found on the mountain slopes to the east of Pirate bay, behind cape Horn, but a ledge could never be uncovered.”

Three subsequent references in the Nelson Tribune were all pokes at merchant and founding postmaster Hamilton Byers:

Dec. 15, 1892: “Kaslo has the only poet in the lake country. His latest production is a poetical tribute to a merchant prince who does business at ‘Pirate Bay.’”

March 2, 1893: “Hamilton Byers can no longer be called ‘Byers of Pirate’s Bay’ as he severed his connection with the Galena Trading Co. on the 1st instant …”

July 13, 1893: “Since ‘Byers of Pirates’ Bay’ located at Kaslo, a complete revolution has taken place in trade and commerce …”

But for the 1890 reference, we might conclude that J.W. Cockle was mistaken when he told James White that Pilot Bay was originally called Pirates Bay, as it was actually a derogatory nickname.

The Pilot Bay post office opened on Aug. 1, 1892 and closed Apr 30, 1908. Although postal records indicate that it moved to Kootenay Bay the following day, in Four Score and More, William Fraser writes that it was actually relocated to what was then called Bakers Landing.

While nothing is left of the townsite, Pilot Bay is still home to several historic landmarks: the chimneys and other ruins of a smelter which operated in 1895-96, a giant sawdust pile from the Davies-Sayward sawmill, and a lighthouse built in 1904 that operated until 1993 and is now cared for by the Friends of West Kootenay Parks.

Previous installments in this series

Introduction

Ainsworth

Alamo

Anaconda

Annable, Apex, and Arrow Park

Annable, revisited

Appledale

Applegrove, Appleby, and Appledale revisited

Argenta and Arrowhead

Aylwin

Bakers, Birds, and Bosun Landing

Balfour

Bannock City, Basin City, and Bear Lake City

Beasley

Beaton

Bealby Point

Bealby Point (aka Florence Park) revisited

Belford and Blewett

Beaverdell and Billings

Birchbank and Birchdale

Blueberry and Bonnington

Boswell, Bosworth, Boulder Mill, and Broadwater

Brandon

Brilliant

Brooklyn, Brouse, and Burnt Flat

Burton

Camborne, Cariboo City, and Carrolls Landing

Carmi, Cedar Point, Circle City, and Clark’s Camp

Carson, Carstens, and Cascade City

Casino and Champion Creek

Castlegar, Part 1

Castlegar, Part 2

Castlegar, Part 3

Christina Lake

Christina City and Christian Valley

Clubb Landing and Coltern

Cody and Champion Creek revisited

Champion Creek revisited, again

Columbia

Columbia City, Columbia Gardens, and Columbia Park

Comaplix

Cooper Creek and Corra Linn

Crawford Bay and Comaplix revisited

Crescent Valley and Craigtown

Davenport

Dawson, Deadwood, and Deanshaven

Deer Park

East Arrow Park and Edgewood

Eholt

English Cove and English Point

Enterprise

Erie

Evans Creek and Evansport

Falls City

Farron

Fauquier

Ferguson

Ferguson, revisited

Fife

Forslund, Fosthall, and Fairview

Fort Shepherd vs. Fort Sheppard, Part 1

Fort Shepherd vs. Fort Sheppard, Part 2

Fort Sheppard, revisited

Fraser’s Landing and Franklin

Fredericton

Fruitvale and Fraine

Galena Bay

Genelle

Gerrard

Gilpin and Glade

Gladstone and Gerrard, revisited

Glendevon and Graham Landing

Gloster City

Goldfields and Gold Hill

Grand Forks, Part 1

Grand Forks, Part 2

Granite Siding and Granite City

Gray Creek, Part 1

Gray Creek, Part 2

Gray Creek, revisited

Green City

Greenwood

Halcyon Hot Springs

Hall Siding and Healy’s Landing

Harrop

Hartford Junction

Hills

Howser, Part 1

Howser, Part 2

Howser, Part 3

Howser, Part 4

Hudu Valley, Huntingtdon, and Healy’s Landing revisited

Inonoaklin Valley (aka Fire Valley)

Jersey, Johnsons Landing, and Jubilee Point

Kaslo, Part 1

Kaslo, Part 2

Kaslo, Part 3

Kaslo, Part 4

Kettle River, Part 1

Kettle River, Part 2

Kinnaird, Part 1

Kinnaird, Part 2

Kitto Landing

Koch Siding and Keen

Kokanee

Kootenay Bay, Kraft, and Krestova

Kuskonook, Part 1

Kuskonook, Part 2

Kuskonook (and Kuskanax), Part 3

Labarthe, Lafferty, and Longbeach

Lardeau, Part 1

Lardeau, Part 2

Lardeau, Part 3

Lardeau, Part 4

Lebahdo

Lemon Creek, Part 1

Lemon Creek, Part 2

Lemon Creek, Part 3

Makinsons Landing and Marblehead

McDonalds Landing, McGuigan, and Meadow Creek

Meadows, Melville, and Miles’ Ferry

Midway

Mineral City and Minton

Mirror Lake and Molly Gibson Landing

Montgomery and Monte Carlo, Part 1

Montgomery and Monte Carlo, Part 2

Montrose and Myncaster

Nakusp, Part 1

Nakusp, Part 2

Nashville

Needles

Nelson, Part 1

Nelson, Part 2

Nelson, Part 3

Nelson, Part 4

Nelson, Wash.

Nelway and New Galway

New Denver, Part 1

New Denver, Part 2

Niagara

Oasis and Oatescott

Ootischenia

Oro

Park Siding and Pass Creek

Passmore

Paterson

Paulson

Perry Siding

Phoenix

Just Posted

Four-storey development slated for Hall-Front intersection in Nelson

Building will be mixed commercial and residential

Wildflower School to keep its bee hive

City council voted to give the school a bylaw exemption

Nearby wildfire closes Idaho Peak

The popular hiking spot is off limits to the public

Granite Pointe’s GM honoured among world’s top golf teachers

David Belling has been included on a top-100 list

VIDEO: Nelson Leafs prepare for new season with training camp

Forty-seven players hit the ice last weekend

VIDEO: Monday Roundup: Aug. 13, 2018

The Nelson Star’s weekly news roundup

Plane fighting wildfire crashes near Canada/U.S. border

The plane experienced an unknown problem.

RCMP to search for body after man drowns in B.C.’s Buntzen Lake

Officers and fire crews responded but the man from the Lower Mainland is believed to have drowned.

Police chiefs call for stricter controls on pill presses to fight opioids

Canada’s police chiefs are urging Ottawa to beef up its fight against the opioid scourge by closely vetting people who import pill presses

Hot, dry conditions forces drought rating to highest level on Vancouver Island

The province says Vancouver Island is under Stage 4 drought conditions

Victoria police say explicit calls continue to target women

Over 50 reports of unwanted, sexually explicit calls have come in

‘It’s like a party in your mouth’

B.C. creator’s Milkshake Burger makes its debut at the PNE

Darkwoods Conservation is closed to all public road access due to wildfires

Boat access to Tye along the shore of Kootenay Lake is still permitted.

Most Read