Returning to the Book of Common Prayer

Over the past several decades the Anglican Church has moved away from the traditional service based on the Book of Common Prayer. St. Saviour’s Anglican Church will be returning to this older tradition by using the 1962 Book of Common Prayer, King James Bible and ancient hymns in a special heritage service this Sunday.

Bishop F. Patrick Clark consecrated the Third Bishop of Kootenay on St. George’s Day 1948.

Bishop F. Patrick Clark consecrated the Third Bishop of Kootenay on St. George’s Day 1948.

Over the past several decades the Anglican Church has moved away from the traditional service based on the Book of Common Prayer. St. Saviour’s Anglican Church will be returning to this older tradition by using the 1962 Book of Common Prayer, King James Bible and ancient hymns in a special heritage service this Sunday.

The Book of Common Prayer used in Canada was originally composed in 1962, and is a national expression of a tradition of Christian worship stemming from the original book published by the Church of England in 1549.

The book simplified older forms, and made the Bible itself the standard of all Christian worship.

This year is also the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible, the language of which was greatly influenced by the book. New liturgical developments in the 1970s brought about the use of the Book of Alternative Services in Canada.

The service will be officiated by the Rev. Marcella Mugford, who will be joined by organist Toby Jenny and choir in the singing many traditional hymns and old favourites. As well, the music includes the traditional sung Eucharist.

The service on Sunday is at 10:30 a.m. at St. Saviour’s Pro-Cathedral, Ward and Silica. All are welcome.