See how the SS Moyie was built

The Kootenay Lake Historical Society invites the public to an open house at the SS Moyie National Historic Site in Kaslo this Sunday.

The Kootenay Lake Historical Society invites the public to an open house at the SS Moyie National Historic Site in Kaslo this Sunday. The site will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., with free admission and refreshments that day. At 1:30 p.m. a ribbon-cutting ceremony will mark the official opening of a new exhibit of historic tools and other items related to shipbuilding and repair. After the ceremony the public is invited to view the exhibit, attend historical presentations in the lower level of the visitor centre, and, of course, visit the SS Moyie. Those who wish to join the Kootenay Lake Historical Society, or renew existing memberships, may do so during the open house. The items in the new exhibit come from an historically significant collection bequeathed to the society by the late Bill Curran, a long-time supporter of the Moyie project and former board member. Bill’s father, Jack Curran, worked as a shipwright in the CPR yards at Nelson, Nakusp and Okanagan Landing. The bequest also includes the handsome sideboard which stood in the SS Moyie’s dining saloon from 1898 until the early 1930s. It was made at the Nelson shipyard, where the Moyie was launched, and has now returned to its old position aboard the ship. The national historic significance of the SS Moyie was officially recognized in 1958. When she retired the year before, she was the oldest and most complete working vessel of her kind in Canada.