The recent storm dealt a severe blow to the SEEDS greenhouse

The recent storm dealt a severe blow to the SEEDS greenhouse

SEEDS picks up after the storm

During the devastating storm June 29, a large tree came crashing through the greenhouse and brought SEEDS’ donation program to a standstill.

The World Food Summit of 1996 defined food security as existing “when all people at all times have access to sufficient, safe, nutritious food to maintain a healthy and active life.”

Food security also means that the people who produce our food are able to earn a decent, living wage growing, catching, producing, processing, transporting, retailing, and serving food.

At the core of food security is access to healthy food and optimal nutrition for all. Food access is closely linked to food supply, so food security is dependent on a healthy and sustainable food system.

Since 2012 a local non-profit organization, SEEDS, has been contributing to the creation of a food secure Nelson.

“We grow healthy food and contribute to food security in Nelson through educational programs, donating harvests to emergency food relief services and by participating in and bringing awareness to needed food system policy change,” says executive director Eva Hernandez.

Up until last month, SEEDS has been growing food for their donation program in the city owned greenhouse at Lakeside Park.

During the devastating storm June 29, a large tree came crashing through the greenhouse and brought SEEDS’ donation program to a standstill.

While they have been able to resume a smaller operation in the outdoor garden space at the park which they created last year, the volumes have been significantly decreased.

Jim Parr, vice-chair of the SEEDS board reports “harvests have been small and we have donated all that we have, last week I brought about three pounds of chard to Our Daily Bread whereas before the storm, it would have been closer to 20 pounds shared out to a variety of organizations.”

While the donation program has slowed, SEEDS has found another way to support food production in Nelson.

They will coordinate the fifth annual Edible Food Garden Tour Sunday, Aug. 30 in cooperation with the EcoSociety, IHA and Nelson Food Cupboard.

The Edible Garden Tour invites gardeners to share their tips, tricks, and gardens with neighbours and community members. It’s a delightful way to spend a day in the garden. More information will be available over the coming weeks.

To stay updated on SEEDS, their work in Nelson and the Edible Garden Tour, visit seedsnelson.org or facebook.com/seedsnelson.