These stones were designed by Nelson artist Kaida McCauley. Photo: Submitted

These stones were designed by Nelson artist Kaida McCauley. Photo: Submitted

Stones for residential school survivors installed at Taghum Hall

Artist Kaida McCauley built 31 stones

Nelson’s Kaida McCauley has designed and installed 31 stones for a pathway at Taghum Hall meant to pay tribute to survivors of residential schools.

McCauley of the Lower Nicola Band in the Nlaka’pamux Nation had family members attend the Kamloops Indian Residential School, where earlier this year the remains of 215 children were discovered.

In response, she fundraised for a stone pathway at the hall.

“The idea was that the pathway could be a place for people (residential school survivors) to come as a place of quiet contemplation,” said McCauley in an email.

“It would also serve as an educational piece. My thinking was, if someone came across the pathway not knowing what it is about, and took a moment to question, ‘what is this about?’ it would put that individual one step closer to understanding a piece of Indigenous people’s history.”

The stones were installed in October, and a plaque by Speedpro Signs added Monday.

To see McCauley’s work, visit Taghum Hall at 5915 Taghum Hall Road.

 

Speedpro Signs installed this plaque at Taghum Hall to be added to Kaida McCauley’s stones. Photo: Submitted

Speedpro Signs installed this plaque at Taghum Hall to be added to Kaida McCauley’s stones. Photo: Submitted