Valhallas Sunrise

Valhallas Sunrise

Stunning images at the Nelson library

The work of photographer Douglas Noblet is featured until the end of August.

Photographer Douglas Noblet spotted the elk last summer in Jasper Park. He was lying down, massive head arced gracefully, antlers illuminated in early morning sun. A few days later, in the nearby Tonquin Valley, he caught the setting sun on Thunderbolt Peak. These are two of the stunning images by Noblet that are on display at the Nelson Public Library until the end of August.

Noblet (pictured at left) was born in France and moved to Canada as a child, eventually settling in Nelson. Home schooled in his youth, he had the freedom to explore the wilderness and develop a range of skills including back country skiing, mountaineering, and both powered and non-powered paragliding.

He got his fixed wing pilot’s license at age 18 and combined this with his other great love, photography. He’s willing to go the extra mile for the perfect shot. Describing the photograph Valhallas Sunrise, he says:

“It’s 4:50 a.m., and the alarm goes off. I can’t see the stars, which is not a good sign, but in the darkness I still get the little airplane ready. We take off and fly towards the opening in the clouds. As we poke through, a beautiful clear sky reveals itself. We head west towards Valhalla Park. Just as we arrive over the Mulvey Basin, the sun finally pokes over the horizon, illuminating the landscape in a bright, pinkish glow. It is stunning, and the air is completely calm. It only lasts a few minutes, but all our efforts are worth it just for this moment.”

Noblet works as a professional ski patroller and volunteer search and rescue team member in addition to his ongoing quest for the next stunning image. He produces calendars, prints, and stretched canvases, with many of his images available at wildairphoto.com.