Youth take action to benefit Basin communities

Ten youth projects were successful in the recent intake of the Columbia Basin Youth Grants program. Offered by Columbia Basin Trust, the grants support youth-led projects that directly benefit Basin youth (ages 15 to 29) and involve youth in project development, planning and implementation.

Members of Columbia Basin Trust’s youth advisory committee adjudicate applications to the Columbia Basin Youth Grants program. Ten projects from around the Basin will receive support.

Members of Columbia Basin Trust’s youth advisory committee adjudicate applications to the Columbia Basin Youth Grants program. Ten projects from around the Basin will receive support.

Ten youth projects were successful in the recent intake of the Columbia Basin Youth Grants program. Offered by Columbia Basin Trust, the grants support youth-led projects that directly benefit Basin youth (ages 15 to 29) and involve youth in project development, planning and implementation.

“Columbia Basin Trust, along with our youth advisory committee, which adjudicates the grant applications, is excited by the number and quality of applications we received this round,” said Wayne Lundeberg, Columbia Basin Trust director, youth initiatives. “It is encouraging to see that applicants are using the support available from our Basin youth liaison, Michelle d’Entremont who assists groups with the project ideas and offers grant writing workshops to help get them started.”

Youth in Valemount will be hosting an event similar to the television show The Amazing Race ($3,500). Organizer Jared Smith said, “I wanted to create an event that will inspire youth to take initiative and create connections.”

The project is supported by Valemount Secondary School principal Dan Kenkel. “We are excited to have this opportunity to get our youth involved in leadership roles in this race. Great things happen when youth get involved in supporting and creating community events.”

Other successful projects include:

λ West Kootenay Youth Peace Summit ($485) (Robson Community School): Youth will be informed about peace, leadership and team building.

λ Thinking sustainably ($3,000) (School District #8, Kootenay Lake): A three-day workshop on sustainable building and permaculture practices.

λ Veggie Bus Project ($3,000), created by students from Self Design High, based in Nelson. The project involves converting a diesel fuelled school bus to a vegetable oil fuelled one. Students will travel and connect with other youth providing a space for conversation and creating an inspiring vehicle for learning.

λ Respectful Relationships ($4,380) (Robson Valley Support Society), a project which will address violence in relationships by helping youth develop emotional intelligence around social justice issues.

• Gender Action Project Theatre ($14,370) (West Kootenay Women’s Association): An interactive theatre presentation to help youth think of positive ways to improve issues in their lives and their communities.

λ Youth Social Action Theatre ($8,330) (Creston and District Community Resource Centre Society): Interactive plays about youth-identified issues.

While the deadline for the next intake of youth grants is in October, it’s never too early to begin your application. Residents with project ideas are encouraged to start their applications by contacting Michelle d’Entremont, Columbia Basin Trust youth liaison at cbtyouth@cbt.org well before the deadline.