Longwalkshortdock takes the stage at Nelson's Spiritbar on Friday night.

Longwalkshortdock comes to Nelson

Longwalkshortdock brings his high energy, video game inspired music to Nelson's Spiritbar.

Longwalkshortdock essentially started the first time Dave King heard gritty electronic music in early ‘80s video games.

Strongly influenced by these sounds and melodies, King started recording and looping segments as a child.

He also got a taste for sampling and recording; taping segments of his piano practice to fool his parents into thinking he was practicing in the other room when he was really playing nintendo (note: actually practicing might have served him better).

A veteran of sound design and electronic music production for well over a decade, Longwalkshortdock’s music has stepped into a genre of its own. Heavily influenced by early ‘80s video game music, metal and rock music, found-sound and vintage analog synthesis, he stacks layers of melody in his tracks until they implode and reform. Heavy drums and aggressive synths join forces with rolling grooves and melodic lead lines to create a wide variety of slamming dance floor originals. Lesser known fact: Not limited to dance music, LWSD’s music crosses into many territories. His vast catalogue of hundreds of songs dives into ambient, IDM, electro, acid, house, big beat, indie rock, drones, electronica and down tempo.

King holds two degrees from the Art Institute of Burnaby for Music Recording and Production. Playing songs and remixes he wrote and produced, Longwalkshortdock performs live PA with live vocals, synthesizers, drum machines, guitar, effects, toys, computers and even some of his own strobes and lighting. Known for his incredibly enthusiastic performances, Longwalkshortdock creates an undeniable stage presence and visceral experience at a show.

Longwalkshortdock takes the stage at Spiritbar Friday. Doors open at 8 p.m. and ticket information is available at the Hume Hotel.

 

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