Nelson librarians pick their favourite new books of 2012.

Nelson librarians share their top reads of 2012

"Confined Space is my top mystery for 2012, bar none." -Anne

Confined Space by Deryn Collier

Confined Space is my top mystery for 2012, bar none. Murder, beer, a vaguely familiar town and the wholly compelling character of Bern Fortier makes this a book to read whether or not you’re lucky enough to live in the Kootenays. Since I left my copy at home and the library copies were out (popular book!), the photo shows me with a copy of Toby’s Room by Booker-prize-winning British author Pat Barker — another 2012 fave. – Anne

 

Imagining Canada: A Century of Photographs Preserved by the New York Times by William Morassutti

I do like a good photographic coffee table book and Imagining Canada caught my eye as a top pick this year for its depiction of Canada as seen through the lens of our American neighbours.  We see First Nations images alongside miners and fishermen; images from the World Wars, hockey and politics; and breathtaking vistas that showcase the Canadian landscape. It’s a beautiful historical photo-documentary showcasing Canada’s diversity. — June

 

King Peggy: An American Secretary, Her Royal Destiny, and the Inspiring Story of How She Changed an African Village by Peggielene Bartels and Eleanor Herman

What I loved about King Peggy was the premise: an American secretary discovers she has a royal destiny — and changes an African village. This true story describes how Peggielene Bartels accepts the crown for a village of 7,000 in Ghana only to find no running water, no high school, and a falling-down palace. Helped by dedicated friends, family, and sponsors, she puts everything into making change — with inspiring results. — Heather

 

Everybody Sees the Ants by A.S. King

Since the subject of bullying among youth is a current and difficult topic, I chose Everybody Sees the Ants as my top pick. Written by a multi-award winning author, this novel tells the story of 15-year-old Lucky Linderman, bullied by Nader McMillan for much too long.  An assortment of unique and quirky characters fills this novel for teens. I loved the way the author combines serious subject matter, including family dysfunction, with humour and magic.  A great read. — Joanne

 

The Seven Series by various authors

Seven grandsons, seven journeys, seven authors, and seven books. What a hook! I started with Between Heaven and Earth by Eric Walters and could not put it down. You can read one of the series or read them all — but I definitely needed to find out the journeys that a dead Grandpa sent each of his grandsons on, including the one grandson no one knew about! Intertwined with mystery, adventure, intrigue and humour, this series is great for ages 11 and up. — Nancy

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