Selkirk College music students shine in showcase concerts

Second-year Selkirk College contemporary music program students are ready to cue the lights on their annual showcase concerts.

The Selkirk College music and technology program students wrap up their two-year studies with an annual showcase event that features a wide genre of music and a whole lot of enthusiasm. The public is invited to check out tomorrow’s stars today at the Shambhala Music and Performance Hall on Nelson’s Tenth Street Campus running through to April 1.

The Selkirk College music and technology program students wrap up their two-year studies with an annual showcase event that features a wide genre of music and a whole lot of enthusiasm. The public is invited to check out tomorrow’s stars today at the Shambhala Music and Performance Hall on Nelson’s Tenth Street Campus running through to April 1.

Second-year Selkirk College contemporary music and technology program students are ready to cue the lights on their annual showcase concerts featuring emerging talent from budding musicians.

“It’s the highlight of their two years at Selkirk College,” says Selkirk College keyboard/arranging instructor Gilles Parenteau. “Our students put these showcases together to demonstrate what they’ve learned and it’s a chance to really express who they are as musicians.”

There are another 10 nights of fantastic entertainment filling Nelson’s Shambhala Music and Performance Hall.

Mitchell Hahn is one of 20 students bringing a wide array of musical genres to the stage including folk, rock, jazz, funk and heavy metal.

“I’ve seen some really awesome electronic music with synth medleys, guitar solos that are just jaw dropping, and some incredible song writing,” he says.

At the end of their music education, the learning and evaluation continues through these performances where students handle every aspect of putting a show together. From lighting and sound to their promotional poster and what they will say on stage, the musicians must consider even the little things like taking the snare drum off the stage before a ballad so it doesn’t vibrate, explains Parenteau.

Hahn, a singer and guitar player, says skills learned in the classroom are easy to understand in theory but putting on a professional show forces students to put it all together and deal with any problems in a dynamic real-life scenario.

“It’s your show and if things go wrong, it’s on you,” he says.

The public is welcome to attend the event at Nelson’s Shambhala Music and Performance Hall on the Tenth Street Campus where the students traditionally play before packed houses.

Like other students, Hahn has family in town to see the show. He’s really looking forward to seeing it all come together for the classmates who’ve been putting in great effort.

“Sharing your music is one of the most rewarding things we as musicians can do so we’re all very excited at the opportunity,” he says.

The dates of the upcoming shows and the students featured are:

March 15: Michael Tylo and Brittany Keller

March 17: Blake Unruh and David Hecht

March 18: Jon Kwak and Amanda Cawley

March 21: Jess Chan and Jane Cho

March 22: Travis Flello and Wes Hughes

March 23: Liam Mackenzie and Nikki Wozney

March 24: Sophie Moreau Parent and SallieMae Salcedo

March 29: Lachlan Tocher and Alessandro Niro

March 31: Ami Cheon and Lucas Burrows

April 1: Nathan Swift and Ashley Pearce

The doors open at 7 p.m. with music starting at 7:30 p.m. The showcases are free. Donations are welcome.

 

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