Clover Leaf by Shary Boyle. She’s one of the artists whose work will be included in THROWN, a new exhibit at Touchstones Museum. Photo: Submitted

Clover Leaf by Shary Boyle. She’s one of the artists whose work will be included in THROWN, a new exhibit at Touchstones Museum. Photo: Submitted

Throwing together a ceramics show at Touchstones Nelson

THROW runs until May 29

Submitted by Touchstones Nelson Museum

There may be few common threads between the artists showcased in THROWN, the latest group exhibition opening at Touchstones Nelson Museum, but one thing they all share is a love for ceramics.

The show, which runs March 13 to May 29, is a group exhibition featuring a diverse cross-section of artists from across the country, all of which offer a distinct and exemplary approach to ceramics.

Featured in the show are Samantha Dickie, an abstract assemblage artist from Victoria; John Kuroc, an artist from Rankin Inlet, Nunavut, specializing in hand-built forms; Shary Boyle, an artist of many mediums who explores the fantastical potential of the human form; Jody Greenman-Barber, whose delicate works find inspiration from dance and movement; Sergio Raffo, a Kaslo resident of Cuban origin who works in both human and architectural forms; Robin Dupont, a specialist in atmospheric firing techniques and a skilled kiln-builder; and Rory Macdonald, an artist and professor at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, whose work blurs the line between installation and intervention.

“These types of medium-centric group exhibitions create an opportunity for a rare form of dialogue amongst the participating artists, even in times when active mentorship and collaboration are not possible, as the respective works speak so strongly of perspective and means and method,” says Touchstones Nelson curator Arin Fay.

THROWN, Fay explains, is the second iteration of an ongoing series of medium-centric exhibitions that was inspired by Lost Thread, a well-received group textile show mounted in 2018 that highlighted six textile artists from across the nation, but with a very specific focus on regional Kootenay artists, and with “the same eye to diversity of expression and methodology,” she adds. “This formula of curating exhibitions gives us the opportunity to include ‘our’ artists in wide-ranging cultural and creative conversations, within a Canadian context.”

This project is being supported through a Canada Council grant and has partnered with Selkirk College and Medalta in Medicine Hat. This exhibition project will support a tour to Medalta in the summer of 2021, a publication, and online programming.

For more information on THROWN and the other exhibitions and programming at Touchstones Nelson Museum, visit www.touchstsonesnelson.ca