Sweet Poetry by Katia Kak’wa Kurtness is among the works that is part of Beyond Recognition: Aboriginal Abstractions, opening June 7 at Touchstones Nelson. Photo submitted

Touchstones exhibit expands perception of Canadian aboriginal art

Beyond Recognition: Aboriginal Abstractions runs June 7 to Aug. 11

Submitted

Touchstones Nelson brings Beyond Recognition: Aboriginal Abstractions to Nelson this summer, an exhibition that adds another chapter to the story of Indigenous art in the Pacific Northwest and across the country.

The art showcased in Beyond Recognition was created by 11 artists past and present, from across the country and spanning decades. Bob Boyer, Benjamin Chee Chee, Robert Houle, Alex Janvier, Katia KaK’wa Kurtness, Ann McLean, Kimowan Metchewais, Susan Point, Rick Rivet, Helen Wassegijig and Linus Woods are renowned, artists using the canvas to open dialogue and contribute to the evolving idea of Aboriginal art in North America.

“Although these artists’ practice is seen as being informed by abstract expressionism, the narrative role this genre takes on in the hands of Aboriginal artists transforms it into a truly North American Aboriginal art form that pays homage to its Indigenous roots,” says Michelle McGeough, an assistant professor at the University of British Columbia, Indigenous art historian, artist and curator who focuses on Indigenous cultural production and research methods.

The exhibition runs June 8 to Aug. 11 with an opening event on Friday in Gallery A from 7 to 9 p.m.

The exhibition is on loan from the Indigenous Art Centre and the Collection of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada.

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