Victoria author Tricia Dower reads at Nelson library

The 1960s was a time of great social upheaval as the movement for civil rights captured the hearts and minds of young people.

Tricia Gower’s new book

The 1960s was a time of great social upheaval as resistance to the Vietnam War and the movement for civil rights captured the hearts and minds of young people on both sides of the border. This is the setting for Victoria author Tricia Dower’s new novel Becoming Lin, published this spring by Caitlin Press. Dower’s Kootenay book launch takes place on Thursday, May 26 at 7 p.m. at the Nelson Public Library.

Becoming Lin follows the story of Linda Wise, desperate to escape her hometown and the collective memory of a sexual assault she endured as a teenager. She is swept into the changing times when she meets a young, newly-ordained Methodist minister with a social justice agenda that includes marches, demonstrations, and the harbouring of draft dodgers hoping to escape to Canada.

A tale of transformation in a time of chaos, Becoming Lin portrays a young woman’s awakening to the moral issues of her time as she confronts the fear that keeps her frozen in childhood.

Tricia Dower’s story collection Silent Girl (Inanna Publications) was nominated for the George Ryga Award for Social Awareness in Literature; her first novel, Stony River (Penguin Canada), was shortlisted for the Canadian Authors Association Award for Fiction. Last year Dower won first prize for creative non-fiction in subTerrain Magazine’s Lush Triumphant literary awards.

Award-winning author Donna Morrissey says Becoming Lin encaptures, with poetic flair and sensual detail, the turbulent and passionate era of the sixties with all of its political, social, and emotional strife.” Indian Horse author Richard Wagamese says “Tricia Dower has established herself as a literary force to be reckoned with.”

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Perry Siding man drowns in kayaking accident

The death occurred in Slocan River last month

Nelson Innovation Centre opens in Railtown

Centre will provide networking, training and workspace for all things tech

Memories all that remain of Balfour general store

History by Greg Nesteroff: In 1912 a log cabin near Balfour became a store

Recent surge in COVID-19 cases not unexpected amid Phase Three of reopening: B.C.’s top doc

Keep circles small, wear masks and be aware of symptoms, Dr. Bonnie Henry says

B.C. NDP changing WorkSafeBC regulations to respond to COVID-19

Employers say reclassifying coronavirus could be ‘ruinous’

Baby raccoon rescued from 10-foot deep drainage pipe on Vancouver Island

‘Its cries were loud, pitiful and heartbreaking,’ Saanich animal control officer says

Statistical flaws led to B.C. wolf cull which didn’t save endangered caribou as estimated

Study finds statistical flaws in an influential 2019 report supporting a wolf cull

Windows broken, racist graffiti left on Okanagan home

Family says nothing like this has happened since they moved to Summerland in 1980s

B.C. man who went by ‘Doctor Ray Gaglardi’ charged with sex assault of teenage boys

The man, 75, is accused of assaulting teenage boys he met through Coquitlam-area churches

B.C.’s potential deficit $12.5 billion as spending spikes, taxes drop

Finance Minister Carole James gives COVID-19 outlook

Commercial huckleberry harvesting restricted in Kootenays

The province of B.C. has banned commercial-scale picking from July 15 to October 15

Canadians torn on scaling back COVID-19 benefits to save money: poll

Of those surveyed, 78 per cent said they were worried about the size of the deficit

Most Read