Danglin’ Dwayne Anglin will perform Bob Marley’s hits at the Capitol Theatre along with the legendary Rastafarian’s backup band The Wailers.

Wailers bring Marley hits to Capitol

Danglin’ Dwayne Anglin spoke to the Star in the lead up to their March 9 concert.

Danglin’ Dwayne Anglin spends over 200 nights a year singing Bob Marley songs worldwide and never gets tired of the privilege.

“Bob Marley was a prophet, a musical genius and a symbol of peace and unity around the globe,” Anglin told the Star from Orlando, where he was partway through a three-month tour of South America, the US and Canada.

“For me it’s truly an honour and a humbling experience to be able to perform songs that have such a positive impact. It’s a daily challenge.”

Together with Marley’s back-up band The Wailers, Anglin will be at the Capitol Theatre on March 9 to perform two full sets of classic reggae numbers, most of them universally recognizable.

“When you grow up in Jamaica you learn him, you’re learning Bob Marley while you’re learning to walk. It’s embedded in our culture and our traditions.”

The 34-year-old Anglin spent some time in the US Navy before deciding he wanted to commit to music. He released his first solo single in 2009, and the momentum from that song made him a name. He was eventually brought on as the frontman by Aston (Family Man) Barrett, Marley’s trusted lieutenant and co-producer.

Though he was reluctant to step into such enormous shoes, he was convinced their music could be a vehicle for social change.

“All these songs speak against the evils we’re facing segregation and separation. We’re here to remind people that ‘as it was in the beginning, so will it be in the end.’”

And The Wailers have a mission to start a non-violent revolution.

“We’re doing God’s work, trying to ignite a revolution, because if we don’t fix this problem we’re facing it will be bloody. The one thing I encourage audiences to do and encourage myself to do is understand with knowledge comes responsibility and accountability.”

That means “if you know better it’s time to do better, because you have no excuse.”

Anglin also hopes to put out a new solo album this year. In the meantime he’s looking forward to spending time in the Kootenays.

“I like that the air’s really fresh, there’s lots of trees and good clean oxygen. When you’re in British Columbia, you know exactly where you are.”

The Wailers will take the Capitol stage at 8 p.m.

 

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