Winlaw-based potter and educator Robin DuPont.

Winlaw potter Robin DuPont needs your vote

Winlaw potter and educator Robin DuPont has been nominated for the 2013 RBC Emerging Artist People’s Choice Award.

Winlaw potter and educator Robin DuPont has been nominated for the 2013 RBC Emerging Artist People’s Choice Award. This annual award, presented by the Gardiner Museum in Toronto, recognizes five outstanding artists from across Canada who work in ceramics. The award will go to the artist who receives the most votes from the participating public.

DuPont lives in the Slocan Valley with his family and operates a studio year-round. He specializes in hand-thrown pieces intended for day-to-day use: a favourite coffee mug, drinking glass, platters and sizable dinner plates, tea pots, pitchers and vases.

His work is fired in a wood-fired kiln, a large brick structure located out-of-doors, surrounded by the coniferous forest of DuPont’s property.

The process of firing with wood is both time and labour intensive: collecting and splitting wood, bring the kiln up to temperature and monitoring it through its firing cycle, often late into the night. The wood provides not only the source of heat but imparts a unique surface finish to the work through ash deposits and heat flashing that occur during firing.

Of the five artists nominated, DuPont stands alone in being the only artist working in functional ceramics (the other nominees work in sculpture and conceptual installation), the only resident of Western Canada, and the only artist living/working in a rural setting.

DuPont was nominated by Katrina Chaytor of the ceramics faculty at the Alberta College of Art and Design where he did his undergraduate studies, between studying at Kootenay School of the Arts in Nelson (where he is now faculty) and completing a graduate degree at Utah State University.

An exhibition featuring the work of the award nominees is currently on display at the Gardiner Museum until October 13. Members of the public have until then to cast their vote for their favourite artist. The winner of the People’s Choice Award will be announced at an awards reception on October 15.

DuPont’s piece for the exhibition furthers his intent that the work take on a life of its own, beyond the context of the gallery, by inviting visitors to handle and interact with the items on display much as they would in daily life, and share the moment via an on-site camera that uploads images to social media. Follow the process here.

To view the nominees and cast your vote, click here. Voting closes October 13.

DuPont’s artist’s statement can be found at robindupont.com.

Just Posted

Ammonia leak shuts down Nelson Curling Club

It’s not yet clear when the leak was detected

Four points for Fawcett as Leafs win 7th straight

Nelson edged the Fernie Ghostriders 4-3

What’s Up: Things to see and do on Family Day

There’s plenty of fun to be had across the West Kootenay this coming long weekend!

Seven Nelson rec projects granted Columbia Basin Trust funding

Nelson’s baseball and tennis clubs were the big winners

Sanchez leads Leafs to 6th straight win

Nelson held off Spokane 3-2 on Friday

B.C. students win Great Waters Challenge video contest

Video, mural and song about saving the salmon claims the top prize

B.C. athlete takes home gold in freestyle aerials at Canada Games

Brayden Kuroda won the event with a combined score of 121.65.

Cabinet likely to extend deadline to reconsider Trans Mountain pipeline

New round of consultations with Indigenous communities is coming

B.C. government provides $75,000 towards salmon study

Study looks at abundance and health of Pacific salmon in Gulf of Alaska

Murdered and missing honoured at Stolen Sisters Memorial March in B.C.

‘We come together to make change within the systems in our society’

UBC researchers develop inexpensive tool to test drinking water

The tricoder can test for biological contamination in real-time

Disgraced ex-Congressman Anthony Weiner released from prison

He was convicted of having illicit online contact with a 15-year-old North Carolina girl in 2017

B.C. communities push back against climate change damages campaign

Activists copying California case that was tossed out of court

Most Read