PROFILE: Goldsbury running for Liberals in Kootenay-Columbia

Long-time Kootenay entrepreneur hoping to bring experience to federal government

Robin Goldsbury is running for the federal Liberal Party of Canada in Kootenay-Columbia.

She’ll be a recognizable name in Cranbrook, having lived and worked in the Key City, however, she has some West Kootenay connections as well, owning a restaurant business beside the Balfour ferry terminal on Kootenay Lake.

Goldsbury will be hitting the regional highways over the course of the campaign to meet with voters in communities across the East and West Kootenay.

“I stepped up because I’m deeply concerned that our rural and small communities because I really think we need a dynamic and progressive voice that’s squeaking for the government,” said Goldsbury. “…There’s a lot of issues that we have here. Urban migration, our kids are leaving, we’ve got succession problems, services are closing down.”

READ: Liberals announce Kootenay-Columbia candidate for October election

She highlighted her work as a party member, hounding the leadership for the creation of a rural caucus at a party convention. Those discussions eventually spurred the creation of a new federal ministry — the Ministry of Rural Economic Development.

“We played a role in getting it, so we actually have a government agency that is actually looking at policy through the eyes of rural Canadians, and that’s really important,” Goldsbury said. “We’ve only begun to tap that ministry.”

Federally, Goldsbury cited her desire to have a voice for the region in the government fold as a major reason for stepping up to run in the election.

She raised issues such as the Columbia River Treaty renegotiations, the loss of Greyhound and the challenges of rural transportation and the role of a Member of Parliament in bringing together various levels of government and volunteers to solve problems.

READ: Liberals’ Kootenay-Columbia candidate stands by Trudeau despite scandal

Her campaign is also taking a new approach to signage; there will be no lawn signs, but will set up larger ones on arterial roadways. Supporters are encouraged to make their own signs and post them in their windows. It’s part of an effort to address waste reduction by focusing on substance over signs, according to her campaign.

Goldsbury, who still calls Cranbrook home, has a background that includes managing corporate marketing with Koocanusa Publications as well as building a value-added forestry business that sold forest botanicals to the floral trade worldwide. She returned to school to complete a Masters in Neuroscience and ended up in Balfour in 2007, where her built the Dock’n Duck Resort with her partner at the Balfour ferry landing.



trevor.crawley@cranbrooktownsman.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Provincial COVID-19 data can now be used for B.C. to prepare for a second wave

In the past week, B.C. has seen a slight spike in daily test-positive case counts

Haitian foster children arrive in Nelson after months-long lobbying effort

Marie-Paule Brisson and Sebastien De Marre have parented girls age 12 and 8 since they were babies

Nelson hospice starts Walk and Talk group in Lakeside Park

The Walk and Talk Grief Group is offered free to anyone grieving the death of a loved one

From baseball stars to forest fires: Southeast Fire Centre water bomber has an interesting past

Tanker 489 is stationed in Castlegar this year, but in the 1960s it belonged to the L.A. Dodgers.

RDCK to implement new emergency alert notification system

System also includes sends alerts for water advisories

‘It’s really frustrating’: B.C. Indigenous groups share impact of border closures

The closures have resulted in disputes between Indigenous groups and local businesses

Islanders want BC Ferries to follow order that lets residents board before tourists

For ferry-dependent communities, ferries are often the sole practical lifeline to work, school or medical appointments.

Washington’s NFL team drops ‘Redskins’ name after 87 years

The franchise was given the name back in 1933, when it was still in Boston

Beverly Hills 90210 star’s family selling Vancouver Island Beach Resort

You can own Jason Priestley’s Terrace Beach Resort in Ucluelet for less than $5 million

Genetic detectives begin work to trace spread of COVID-19 in Canada

The kinds of genetic technology being used for this project did not exist when SARS hit Canada in 2003

Sports fishers protest Fraser River Chinook closures

Public Fishery Alliance wants hatchery fish open for harvest

Amber Alert for two Quebec girls cancelled after bodies found

Romy Carpentier, 6, Norah Carpentier, 11, and their father, Martin Carpentier, missing since Wednesday

B.C. man prepares to be first to receive double-hand transplant in Canada

After the surgery, transplant patients face a long recovery

Most Read