Tulips, daffodils and hyacinths are all part of the beauty at the Chilliwack Tulip Festival. (Submitted photo)

Western Canada’s largest tulip fest opens with hyacinths and daffodils

Annual Chilliwack Tulip Festival draws in tens of thousands of visitors, keen to enjoy displays

Spring has sprung and it’s time to behold the beauty of flowers.

Hyacinths and daffodils will be blooming soon, as a sort of opening act to the Chilliwack Tulip Festival (formerly Tulips of the Valley.) This year’s festival begins on April 10 and will include more than 6.5 million bulbs. The festival has been held annually since 2006, and is Western Canada’s largest and longest-running tulip fest.

Tens of thousands of people will pop in to bask in the bright colours, take photographs and enjoy the scenery all around the festival’s grounds.

Festival founder Kate Onos-Gilbert and her family — who have become one of the country’s foremost “grow-to” tulip experts — have primed their fields to offer visitors an incomparable explosion of colour, fragrance, and all-ages fun.

Beginning April 10, the first two weeks of the festival will feature 10 varieties of hyacinths and 17 varieties of daffodils, and include one-of-a-kind, handmade floral mosaics. From the second weekend forward, an awe-inspiring 30 varieties of tulips will be in bloom, totalling more than 6.5 million bulbs in all the colours of the rainbow, planted in extra wide rows for easy viewing and convenient photo opportunities. Overall, there are 20 acres of spring beauty to behold.

And all of the other family-friendly attractions from past years will be returning: the Rotary Train (weekends only), weekend food trucks (including fresh, authentic Dutch “stroop” waffles), a something-for-everyone flower-themed gift shop, and tractor rides.

The Chilliwack Tulip Festival offers a spectacular environment for photographers, whether in the fields, next to the windmill and traditional Dutch bicycle, or from the festival’s famous tulip swing over the flowers. Every year the festival creates new photo-op locations on their fields, and this year is no exception with a few new surprises for visitors to discover.

“Tulips of the Valley has been a labour of love for me and my family since we started growing tulips decades ago,” says Kate Onos-Gilbert. “Although we’ve changed its name this year, returning visitors will find everything they’ve always loved about the festival, while newcomers will be overwhelmed by one of the most beautiful, elaborate displays of flowers to be found anywhere in Canada. This is a true celebration of springtime and the beauty of nature. We look forward to welcoming everyone for our 13th amazing year.”

The Chilliwack Tulip Festival runs every day from April 10, for approximately four weeks, and is located just minutes from Highway 1, at 41310 Yale Rd. Parking is free. For complete details, including ticket pricing, visit chilliwacktulipfest.com.


@CHWKcommunity
jpeters@theprogress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

School District 8 votes to move Grade 9 from LVR to Trafalgar

The board also delayed a decision on reconfiguring grades at Slocan schools

Storm prompts travel warning for Boundary, West Kootenay

Up to 25 cm expected on high mountain passes

Cops seize load of pot near Salmo

Traffic stop nets hundreds of pounds of cannabis

VIDEO: Octopus, bald eagle battle after bird ‘bites off more than it can chew’ in B.C. waters

B.C. crew films fight between the two feisty animals in Quatsino off north Vancouver Island

Raptors fans show Kawhi the love in his return to Toronto

Leonard receives championship ring, leads new club to win

Process to identify those killed in Gabriola plane crash could take days

Canadian flight museum suggests Alex Bahlsen of Mill Bay died in Tuesday’s crash

‘Honest mistake:’ RCMP says B.C. cannabis shop can keep image of infamous Mountie

Sam Steele wearing military, not RCMP uniform in image depicted in Jimmy’s Cannabis window

B.C. conservation officers put down fawn blinded by pellet gun on Vancouver Island

Young deer found near construction site in Hammond Bay area in Nanaimo, B.C.

Laid-off forest workers converge on B.C. legislature

Loggers call for action on strike, provincial stumpage

B.C. guide fined $2K in first conviction under new federal whale protection laws

Scott Babcock found guilty of approaching a North Pacific humpback whale at less than 100 metres

Feds urge Air Canada to fix booking problems as travel season approaches

The airline introduced the new reservation system more than three weeks ago

Almost 14,000 Canadians killed by opioids since 2016: new national study

17,000 people have been hospitalized for opioid-related poisoning

Most Read