L to R: Juan Rincon, Key Account Manager, FortisBC; Colin Richardson, Energy Systems Manager, UBCO; and Glenn McIntyre, Thermal Energy Manager, UBCO, outside the new Commons building on the UBC Okanagan campus in Kelowna.

L to R: Juan Rincon, Key Account Manager, FortisBC; Colin Richardson, Energy Systems Manager, UBCO; and Glenn McIntyre, Thermal Energy Manager, UBCO, outside the new Commons building on the UBC Okanagan campus in Kelowna.

UBCO graduates with top marks in energy-efficiency innovation by partnering with FortisBC

FortisBC has rebates that can help you save energy and money

In the past 15 years the University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus (UBCO) has rapidly expanded from 12 to 46 buildings. UBCO has always put innovation and energy efficiency first, not only in new construction projects but also when upgrading existing infrastructure. And FortisBC has been there every step of the way, supporting the university in its sustainability goals to reduce its carbon footprint and optimize its energy systems, by providing rebates on energy-efficiency measures and ongoing support, like funding an on-staff thermal energy manager.

Savings that last year after year

In the past two years alone, the university has received more than $240,000 in rebates from FortisBC for installing a chiller, boiler upgrades, LED lighting, ventilation and heat recovery. In total, an annual energy savings of 1,900 gigajoules of natural gas and 1,333,500 kWh of electricity are projected for these projects, which results in a total annual dollar savings of approximately $131,000 for UBCO.

These upgrades have additional benefits as well. “The university’s efforts to reduce energy use by taking advantage of FortisBC’s rebate programs will mean less pressure on the campus’s existing district energy system – delaying the need for capital upgrades,” said Juan Rincon, a FortisBC key account manager.

Colin Richardson, Energy Systems Manager, UBCO; Glen McIntyre, Thermal Energy Manager, UBCO; and Juan Rincon, Key Account Manager, FortisBC, tour the utilities area of the Commons building at the UBCO campus.

Colin Richardson, Energy Systems Manager, UBCO; Glen McIntyre, Thermal Energy Manager, UBCO; and Juan Rincon, Key Account Manager, FortisBC, tour the utilities area of the Commons building at the UBCO campus.

It takes a champion to move these upgrades along

Colin Richardson, UBCO’s energy systems manager, and Glen McIntyre, UBCO’s FortisBC-funded thermal energy manager, have been champions for pursuing and advancing energy efficiency in both new construction and renovation projects at the university.

“The support for Glen’s position, as well as all the rebates we’ve received from FortisBC, has significantly increased our ability to implement energy-saving projects,” said Richardson.

A shared commitment to reduce greenhouse gases

Both FortisBC and UBCO are committed to supporting the province of BC’s climate action goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs). To measure its progress, FortisBC created 30BY30, a tangible milestone aimed at reducing its customers’ GHGs by 30 per cent by the year 2030. The utility’s work with UBCO is a win-win for both organizations to achieve their respective goals, and help create a healthier tomorrow for all British Columbians.

Glen McIntyre, Thermal Energy Manager, UBCO, and Juan Rincon, Key Account Manager, FortisBC, tour the utilities area of the Commons building at the UBCO campus.

Glen McIntyre, Thermal Energy Manager, UBCO, and Juan Rincon, Key Account Manager, FortisBC, tour the utilities area of the Commons building at the UBCO campus.

Even bigger rebates

Whether you’re retrofitting or building new, a small commercial customer or a large institution like UBCO, FortisBC has rebates that can help you save energy and money when selecting high-efficiency equipment and products. Now, until Dec. 31, 2021, some of these rebates are even bigger! Discover them all at fortisbc.com/bigger.

That’s energy at work.

Glen McIntyre, Thermal Energy Manager, UBCO, and Juan Rincon, Key Account Manager, FortisBC, tour the utilities area of the Commons building at the UBCO campus.

Glen McIntyre, Thermal Energy Manager, UBCO, and Juan Rincon, Key Account Manager, FortisBC, tour the utilities area of the Commons building at the UBCO campus.

*Bigger rebates on select upgrades are available until Dec. 31, 2021. Bigger rebates on commercial furnaces are available until March 31, 2021. Participants must be an owner, a long-term leaseholder or a builder/developer. Rebate applications must be submitted within 365 days of the purchase date of products. Only available to FortisBC commercial natural gas and electricity customers and commercial municipal electricity customers of Penticton, Summerland, Grand Forks and Nelson Hydro. Additional terms and conditions apply.

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