In this screen grab from video issued by Britain’s Oxford University, a volunteer is injected with either an experimental COVID-19 vaccine or a comparison shot as part of the first human trials in the U.K. to test a potential vaccine, led by Oxford University in England on April 25, 2020. About 100 research groups around the world are pursuing vaccines against the coronavirus, with nearly a dozen in early stages of human trials or poised to start. (University of Oxford via AP)

Are COVID-19 mutations cause for alarm? Experts say no, viruses change often

A vaccine could be updated similarly to how flu shots are changed for new strains

A recent study sparked some worry last week when it revealed a mutation “of urgent concern” in the virus responsible for COVID-19. But experts say more research is needed to determine what that really means.

The preliminary, non peer-reviewed study from the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico indicated that a COVID-19 strand containing a specific mutation — on the spike protein D614G — is emerging as the dominant form of the virus.

The U.S. team’s study, which analyzed data from coronavirus patients in England, also suggested the mutation could be making the virus more infectious.

The problem, experts say, is that the research doesn’t reveal any proof of that.

“There’s really no evidence from the scientific study that this particular mutation is causing the virus to be more transmissible than other genetic variants of the virus,” said Dr. Isaac Bogoch, an infectious diseases specialist based at Toronto General Hospital and a faculty member at the University of Toronto.

“Could a mutation (with that effect) happen? Sure. Will it happen? Who knows.”

READ MORE: ‘Community immunity’ testing for COVID-19 getting closer in B.C.

Mutations are commonplace in nature, whether it’s in viruses or any other living organism, and they occur when a “mistake” is made during a cell’s replication phase.

While some mutations can make a virus more potent, others might make it less effective. And most just don’t do anything.

“Viruses mutate, that’s what they do, they just change over time,” said BC Children’s Hospital clinical researcher Dr. Srinivas Murthy, who added he’s not concerned with the findings from the U.S. research.

“Truthfully, I have no takeaways from it. … We have no data from this (study) that says the transmissibility is different and we have no data from this that says the severity is any different.”

Scientists have found plenty of mutations to the novel coronavirus, not just D614G. A recent study from University College London indicated that ”198 sites in the SARS-CoV-2 genome appear to have already undergone recurrent, independent mutations.”

That study also found the vast majority of those mutations to be ”likely neutral.”

READ MORE: Normal life won’t fully return until COVID-19 vaccine developed, Trudeau says

Art Poon, an associate health sciences professor and expert in virus evolution at Western University in London, Ont., says people generally fear mutations because they perceive the word to mean a freakish flaw.

“When people hear mutation they think of X-Men, right?” Poon said. “But it’s important to remember most mutations don’t do much of anything.”

Poon says the reason D614G has been given so much attention is because its of prevalence in the COVID-19 genome.

Scientists believe the mutation was introduced to Europe in early February, with Poon adding it was likely ”inherited from a single ancestor that happened to be one of the first lineages to move out of China.”

That would mean the specific D614G mutation isn’t technically new, as most cases in the U.S. and Canada would have probably come from this strand.

Even if Canada’s first COVID-19 cases came from the original virus that didn’t carry the D614G mutation, Poon said North America would soon after have had an influx in cases that did carry the mutation once the virus migrated in from Europe.

That could explain why the strand is emerging as dominant, as the U.S. study suggested, he said.

“But that’s not because of selection for human-to-human transmission, it would be due to what we call a ‘founder effect’ — (where) the lineage founding the epidemic in Europe happened to carry this mutation,” Poon said.

Bogoch said mutations can actually help us better understand a virus by pinpointing its origin.

“They’re like fingerprints of the virus,” he said. ”And there’s a lot of good information that these mutations can really help scientists with.”

While mutations can potentially become problematic in terms of vaccine development, experts say there’s no evidence D614G will cause researchers to have to abandon any work that’s already being done.

And those problems can usually be solved, anyway.

Vaccines are created to target a specific part of the virus, Bogoch said, so if the part being targeted is changing, the vaccine would also need to adapt. Usually that means creating a vaccine that is constantly updated and taken periodically — similar to the flu shot — rather than a one-time inoculation.

“That’s why we have seasonal influenza vaccine, because we’re essentially playing an arms race with how we create a vaccine against an evolving virus,” Bogoch said. “So could that happen with COVID-19? Maybe, who knows. It is certainly a possibility.

“But it’s just too soon to speculate how this is going to impact a vaccine that we don’t even have yet.”

Melissa Couto, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Fire damages Harrop nursery

The cause of the blaze is under investigation

LETTER: Time to re-purpose airstrip

From reader John Bowden

Nelson Innovation Centre to host pitch competition

Deadline to apply for the first of three events is Sept. 24

School bus registration now open in SD8

Registration deadline is Sept. 4

BUSINESS BUZZ: COVID and cash, ATCO’s Weatherford heads Selkirk board, and more

Darren Davidson brings us the latest goings-on in the local business world

‘Don’t kill my mom’: Ryan Reynolds calls on young British Columbians to be COVID-smart

‘Deadpool’ celebrity responds to premier’s call for social influence support

Captain Horvat’s OT marker lifts Canucks to 4-3 win over Blues

Vancouver takes 2-0 lead in best-of-7 NHL playoff series with St. Louis

Widow of slain Red Deer doctor thanks community for support ahead of vigil

Fellow doctors, members of the public will gather for a physically-distanced vigil in central Alberta

Protesters showcase massive old yellow cedar as Port Renfrew area forest blockade continues

9.5-foot-wide yellow cedar measured by Ancient Forest Alliance campaigners in Fairy Creek watershed

Taking dog feces and a jackhammer to neighbourhood dispute costs B.C. man $16,000

‘Pellegrin’s actions were motivated by malice …a vindictive, pointless, dangerous and unlawful act’

Racist stickers at Keremeos pub leaves group uneasy and angry

The ‘OK’ hand gesture is a known hate-symbol

VIDEO: World responds to B.C. girl after pandemic cancels birthday party

Dozens of cards and numerous packages were delivered to six-year-old Charlie Manning

Expected fall peak of COVID-19 in Canada could overwhelm health systems: Tam

National modelling projections released Friday show an expected peak in cases this fall

Most Read