(Photo by David Goldman/The Associated Press)

BC Hydro warns of colder temperatures in coming weeks

Electric company has activated its winter payment program

In some regions of B.C. the flowers have already begun to bloom, while snow squalls continue to blanket other areas of the province.

Meteorologists are anticipating colder than normal temperatures to continue as we move towards the Spring, according to a statement from BC Hydro, who have activated their Winter Payment Plan.

“After a colder than usual December and return of cold air to many regions late January into early February, BC Hydro’s meteorologists are predicting the next couple of months will likely continue to bring below average temperatures,” read a portion of the statement.

The company says colder temperatures have led to higher electricity bills, especially for those using electric heat. Temperature records have already been broken in Kelowna, Vernon, Salmon Arm, Princeton, Campbell River, Tofino and Whistler since early November. BC Hydro also witnessed peak electricity demand in the second half of December 2017 that was above the previous 10-year average.

“Cold temperatures across the province drive-up electricity usage, resulting in higher BC Hydro bills that can be difficult for families to manage alongside other household expenses,” said Chris O’Riley, BC Hydro’s President & Chief Operating Officer. “Our meteorologists are predicting colder than average temperatures will continue over the next of couple of months and we want to provide customers with help to manage their payments.”

The plan will allow customers to spread out their winter electricity bills over a six-month period.

This program was first introduced last winter, during the annual billing period that runs from Dec. 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018. Anyone interested can learn more by calling 1-800-BCHYDRO.

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