The B.C. government is conducting a catch and release program for burbot at Moyie Lake in order to collect eggs as part of ongoing recovery efforts.

Biologists collecting fish eggs at East Kootenay lake

Burbot recovery program to boost populations in Kootenay Lake and Kootenay River

Fish biologists will be spending the next two weeks catching and releasing burbot on Moyie Lake for hatchery egg collection.

The project is part of recovery efforts for the Lower Kootenay burbot population, which have been fished for sport and substinence out of Kootenay Lake and Kootenay River, as well as down across the Canada/USA border, according to a press release from the provincial government.

The goal is to collect five million to seven million fertilized eggs from up to 25 families, with all fish caught being tagged and released back into the lake.

The population was recognized to be at risk of local extinction during the mid-1990s, but collaborative recovery efforts are ongoing between B.C. and American interests such as the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho, Idaho Fish and Game, US Army Corps of Engineers, and the University of Idaho.

Fertilized eggs from Moyie Lake have been raised in a hatchery in Idaho and released back into Kootenay Lake and Kootenay River since 2009.

The Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Deveopment has continuously monitored the burbot population in Moyie Lake for the last 10 years, which is comprised of approximately 10,000 spawning burbot.

Since the program began, spawning survival has remained relatively constant at 83 per cent. On average, biologists handle 360 fish per season, collecting between 0.02 and 0.03 per cent of Moyie Lake’s available eggs.

The ministry is hoping to collect eggs exclusively from the Kootenay River stock starting in 2022. Population targets for Kootenay Lake is 20,000 burbot by 2028, which will inovlve release 60,000 juveniles per year.

If any member of the public catches a tagged burbot, they are encouraged to let the minstry know by calling 250-354-6333. Pertinent information includes the location of the catch, length of the fish, weight and sex.

Just Posted

Abra Brynne wins Kootenay-Columbia Green Party nomination

Brynne is one of three candidates who will challenge MP Wayne Stetski

Stetski talks up NDP election platform

NDP candidate for Kootenay-Columbia riding outlines election ‘commitments’ to Canadian voters

Rossland council passes plastic bag ban despite legal questions

Appeal court ruling threw bylaw in limbo, but council voted to move forward

Nelson’s Walgren added to B.C.’s speed skating team

Walgren will compete at next year’s Special Olympic Speed Skating Nationals

Police call Appledale death a homicide

But few other details being released

VIDEO: Reports say Lashana Lynch is the new 007

Daniel Craig will reprise his role as Bond one last time

Worried about bats? Here’s what to do if you come across one in B.C.

Bat expert with the BC Community Bat Program urges caution around the small creatures

B.C. on right road with tougher ride-hailing driver rules, says expert

The provincial government is holding firm that ride-hailing drivers have a Class 4 licence

RCMP investigating alleged ‘sexual misconduct’ by cyclist on BCIT campus

BCIT said they were reviewing video evidence of the incident

New home cost dips in B.C.’s large urban centres

Victoria, Kelowna, Vancouver prices decline from last year

Graphic suicide scene edited out of ‘13 Reasons Why’ finale

Suicide prevention groups support the decision

Nine kittens and cats rescued after being locked in bins in northern B.C.: SPCA

SPCA says cats were starving, and matted with feces and urine

High-speed rail link would run from Vancouver to Seattle in under 1 hour: study

Annual ridership is projected to exceed three million

ICBC insurance renewals get more complicated this year

Crash history, driver risk prompt more reporting requirements

Most Read