Boat wake can be damaging to the Kootenay Lake shoreline.

Boaters urged to slow down on Kootenay Lake

Boaters are being reminded to operate their pleasure craft safely and responsibly after residents in the Balfour area expressed concern.

Boaters are being reminded to operate their pleasure craft safely and responsibly after residents in the Balfour area expressed concern.

Regional District of Central Kootenay director Ramona Faust says people in Area E are worried that boats are travelling too fast for conditions as well as creating wake that is damaging the shoreline and its structures.

“High speed puts boaters at risk of hitting logs and other debris that results from freshet and the rising lake level,” she says. “It can be a dangerous thing to be going too fast this time of year.”

Faust believes a reminder that the recent spring run-off brings with it debris that ends up in the lake is prudent. And with the lake levels now near its peak, water picks up rubble beached along the shore.

Boaters are also urged to reduce the wake from their watercraft near developed shorelines as the powerful waves can negatively impact docks, moored boats and fishing                      activity, says Faust.

“Wake is the ripple effect that the boat makes but it can be a lot more than a ripple, especially if it’s made by a big boat travelling at high speeds,” she explains.

While wake can cause damage to structures at the shore, the force of the water can also erode the shoreline itself.

“For environmental reasons, we have shore spawners and little alcoves and wake can be disruptive,” she says acknowledging that a “vicious storm can to the same.”

Faust isn’t a boater but lives on the lake and crosses it by ferry often. She says she didn’t know that damage caused by boats’ wake was an issue.

“I thought if I don’t know then probably others didn’t know either,” she says.

 

Just Posted

Nelson Women’s March joins others across globe

The event was held to promote equality and an end to violence against women

Born 1 pound, 11 ounces, Winlaw premature baby comes home

Indra Greaves was born at the Nelson hospital after just 24 weeks of gestation

Leafs stretch winning streak to 8 games

Nelson downed Grand Forks 5-2 on Friday

RDCK moves ahead with Castlegar rec complex upgrade plan

Board approves grant application for $13 million from provincial, federal governments

Cottonwood Lake preservation group surpasses $50,000 fundraising goal

In 28 days, 393 donors have contributed to the fund

Students seen mocking Native Americans could face expulsion

One 11-minute video of the confrontation shows the Haka dance and students loudly chanting

Olympic softball qualifier to be held in B.C.

Announcement made Saturday evening from Europe

B.C. resident creates global sport training program

The 20 hour course teaches the science and application of interval training at the university level

B.C. VIEWS: Fact-checking the NDP’s speculation tax on empty homes

Negative-option billing is still legal for governments

May plans next move in Brexit fight as chances rise of delay

Some say a lack of action could trigger a ‘public tsunami’

Group challenges ruling for doctors to give referrals for services that clash with beliefs

A group of five Canadian doctors and three professional organizations is appealing

Major winter storm wreaks havoc on U.S. travel

Nearly 5,000 flights were cancelled Sunday around the country

CONSUMER REPORT: What to buy each month in 2019 to save money

Resolve to buy all of the things you want and need, but pay less money for them

Want to avoid the speculation tax on your vacant home? Rent it out, Horgan says

Premier John Horgan and Sheila Malcolmson say speculation and vacancy tax addresses homelessness

Most Read