The campfire ban begins on Thursday at noon Pacific.

Campfires banned in Southeast Fire Centre as of Thursday

With dry lightning and heat in forecast, Fire Centre moves to help prevent human-caused wildfires

Earlier this week, a spokesperson for the Southest Fire Centre said that a campfire ban may be coming. On Tuesday afternoon, it became official. Campfires are banned in the Southeast Fire Centre as of noon Pacific on Thursday, July 26, 2018.

READ: Southeast Fire Centre on alert,

This campfire ban will remain in place until the public is otherwise notified.

The Southeast Fire Centre is currently experiencing hot and dry conditions, says a press release from the Ministry of Forests, Lands Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development. The fire danger rating is “moderate” in some areas, with larger areas rated “high” and “extreme”. Forest fuels are drying out quickly, and hot weather and dry lightning are in the forecast. It is crucial to reduce the risk of human-caused wildfires, so the BC Wildfire Service can deal with any naturally occurring fires that start in the region.

This prohibition applies to all public and private land unless specified otherwise – for example, in a local government bylaw. Please check with local government authorities for any other restrictions before lighting any fire.

The following activities are also prohibited:

* the use of outdoor stoves and portable campfire apparatuses that are not CSA-approved or ULC-approved

* the use of chimneas, air curtain burners, sky lanterns, fireworks, firecrackers, burn barrels or burn cages of any size or description

* the use of tiki torches and similar kinds of torches

* the use of binary exploding targets (e.g. for rifle target practice)

These prohibitions do not apply to CSA-rated or ULC-rated cooking stoves that use gas, propane or briquettes, or to a portable campfire apparatus that uses briquettes, liquid or gaseous fuel, so long as the height of the flame is less than 15 centimetres.

Prohibitions on larger Category 2 and Category 3 open fires remain in effect throughout the Southeast Fire Centre.

To learn about the differences between campfires, Category 2 open fires and Category 3 open fires, visit: www.gov.bc.ca/wildfirebans

Review the open fire regulations poster at: www.gov.bc.ca/openfireregs

Anyone found in contravention of an open burning prohibition may be issued a ticket for $1,150, required to pay an administrative penalty of $10,000 or, if convicted in court, fined up to $100,000 and/or sentenced to one year in jail. If the contravention causes or contributes to a wildfire, the person responsible may be ordered to pay all firefighting and associated costs.

The Southeast Fire Centre extends from the U.S. border in the south to Mica Dam in the north, and from the Okanagan Highlands and Monashee Mountains in the west to the B.C.-Alberta border in the east.

Report a wildfire or open burning violation by calling 1 800 663-5555 toll-free or *5555 on a cellphone. For the latest information on current wildfire activity, burning restrictions, road closures and air quality advisories, go to: http://www.bcwildfire.ca

You can also follow the latest wildfire news:

* On Twitter: http://twitter.com/BCGovFireInfo

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

No charges yet in death of Abbotsford officer Allan Young

Police and Crown say the investigation is still underway

COLUMN: What the Nelson library needs most … is you!

Avi Silberstein of the library fills us in on the progress of re-opening

Practical fashion: Local designers make supplies for Nelson dentists

Surgical caps and gowns have been in short supply for dentists during the pandemic

UPDATE: Search effort underway for Slocan River drowning victim

The man was swimming near Winlaw on Wednesday.

371 British Columbians battling COVID-19, health officials confirm

Thursday (Aug. 6) saw a second straight day of nearly 50 new confirmed cases

Statistics Canada says country gained 419,000 jobs in July

National unemployment rate was 10.9 per cent in July, down from the 12.3 per cent recorded in June

Canada plans $3.6 billion in retaliatory tariffs on U.S. in aluminium dispute

The new Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement that replaced NAFTA went into force on July 1

Canada ‘profoundly concerned’ over China death sentence for citizen in drug case

Police later confiscated more than 120 kilograms of the drug from Xu Weihong’s home

Smoker Farms bringing craft-style cannabis to Beaverdell

Husband-wife team growing small-scale cultivations of marijuana

Answers to 5 common questions facing families for the COVID-19 school year

COVID-19 protocols are likely to vary even more at the school board level, and even and school-to-school.

Visitors and non-residents entering closed remote B.C. First Nation’s territories

With limited resources, they say they don’t have any authority or power to enforce the closures

UBC loses appeal on Fisheries Act convictions

BC Supreme Court upholds order to pay $1.55-million fine

Masks to be mandatory on BC Transit, TransLink starting Aug. 24

Both BC Transit and TransLink made the announcement in separate press releases on Thursday

Most Read