The Regional District of Central Kootenay says new front-load bins are coming to recycling depots in the central waste sub-region as of Oct. 19.

Changes coming to RDCK recycling

The Kaslo recycling depot will be moving to the transfer station as of Oct. 19.

Residents of the RDCK’s central sub-region will save approximately $200,000 annually as the regional district makes changes to its recycling program.

The sub-region, which spans from north of Marblehead to south of Salmo, will see new front load bins at the recycling depots as of Oct. 19. The front-load collection bins increase collection efficiency as recyclable materials are compacted en-route and multiple sites are serviced on a single route. The rest of the RDCK adopted the front-load collection model in 2011.

“RDCK directors and staff continue the process of upgrading our resource recovery infrastructure,” said Tom Newell, chair of the central resource recovery committee. “This revitalized recycling program, being safer, more efficient and at a reduced cost to our taxpayers, is one more huge step forward.”

You will no longer be required to climb stairs to deposit recyclables. The materials collected remain the same and all material, including cardboard, will be co-mingled in a single stream. A cardboard-only bin will remain at the Lakeside Dr. recycling depot in Nelson. Glass will continue to be collected in separate bins.

Following the changes to the depots, blue bags will no longer be required at RDCK recycling depots in the central sub-region, however they may continue to be required for some curbside services. The changes to the RDCK depot recycling program do not impact curbside service.

Meanwhile, the Kaslo recycling depot will be moved from the public works yard to the transfer station on Oct. 19. The relocation is being made at the village’s request.

In 2014, the Village of Kaslo introduced curbside collection service for recyclables with funding through the Multi-Material BC product stewardship program.

Through the program, the producers of packaging and printed paper assume the cost of recycling the materials they produce. Because the RDCK was not included in the program, RDCK depot recycling programs continue to be funded through local taxation. Increased use of the curbside program funded by producers will result in savings for residents of the RDCK central resource recovery service area.

“The directors for this service area will continue to pressure Multi-Material BC and the provincial government to fulfill their obligation to provide producer-funded depot recycling services for residents throughout the RDCK, as they do for other BC communities,” Newell said. “Once the RDCK is satisfied that the level of service provided by Multi-Material BC is adequate, the RDCK property tax funded recycling program will be reduced or eliminated.”

Rural Kaslo residents who don’t receive curbside service will be able to deposit their recyclables at the same time and location that they dispose of their garbage. The recycling depots will be open during transfer station operating hours: Sundays, Tuesdays, and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

 

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