Studies have already determined the Nelson youth centre could support another two storeys. The questions now are whether the ground beneath it is strong enough and whether there is a market for “micro-unit” housing there.

City to study youth centre roof housing further

Whether the ground under the Youth Centre could hold two more storeys of housing is unknown, as is the market for the housing.

The City of Nelson may spend about $20,000 for two feasibility studies toward putting two storeys of housing on the youth centre roof, which according to city staff is at the end of its life. A new roof would cost about $100,000.

The idea was presented to council by the city’s facilities manager Peter Sinstadt recently.  His report is attached to the online version of this story at nelsonstar.com. Council has not decided to go ahead with the two studies but will consider them at an upcoming priority-setting session, according to city manager Kevin Cormack.

One study would be a geotechnical investigation of whether the ground under the city-owned building would handle the weight of two more storeys. The second would be a market study to answer questions about the target market including price and whether rental or sale is best.

A study done last year didn’t address those questions, but simply looked at building construction issues, concluding it would be structurally possible to add two storeys. Cormack says he hopes funding for the  new studies will come from the Columbia Basin Trust.

Sinstadt told council he thought “micro-units” of less than 500 square feet would be appropriate for the project, but the market study would be needed to confirm that.

He recommended the two studies be done by December of this year.

“In larger communities,” Cormack said, “micro units are part of the solution for affordable housing. We need to decide if they are viable in a smaller community like Nelson. Is there a market for them as ownership or as rental, and at what price?”

Sinstadt’s proposal says such units are often built modular, off-site, and are aimed at low-end market pricing. They would not be built by the city but by a private developer. Possible target markets could be bachelor or one-bedroom for singles, independent affordable housing for youth 22-plus, or lowcost home ownership, all of which he said are gaps identified in the city’s affordable housing strategy

Just Posted

Selkirk College students protest proposed tuition increases

Sudents’ union says this year’s 2 per cent increase puts education out of reach for some

Nelson project funds rural schools in Nepal

Mountain trekker David Swain runs the Altitude Project

Trail area homicide investigation continues

Jan. 14 marked one year since Jordan Workman was discovered in the trunk of a burnt car

Leafs, Nitehawks settle for 4-4 tie

Nelson is now unbeaten in nine straight games

Former ski champ and MLA’s son hope to open Castlegar cannabis store next month

Felix Belczyk and Ben Conroy are in the approval process for local Spiritleaf outlet

VIDEO: Monday Roundup

The Star’s weekly news roundup

Trial starts for man accused of killing Winnipeg bus driver

The Winnipeg bus driver was stabbed multiple times back in 2017

Giuliani clarifies comments about Trump Tower Moscow project

Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani clarifies comments he made

Teen in confrontation with Native American: I didn’t provoke

Nick Sandmann of Covington Catholic High School said he was trying to defuse the situation

New military armoury opens in Cranbrook

Military presence in the Key City a part of the 44th Engineer Squadron

Speaker brings report on allegations to B.C. legislature committee

Report describes Darryl Plecas’ suspicions about senior staff

B.C. man charged in 2014 snake venom death of toddler

Henry Thomas was taking care of the North Vancouver girl the day before she died

Parole granted for drunk driver that killed BC RCMP officer

Kenneth Jacob Fenton will be able to attend alcohol abuse treatment, nearly three years after crash that killed Const. Sarah Beckett

Doug Ford says the Liberals’ carbon tax will plunge Canada into recession

The Ontario premier said there are already warning signs of difficult economic times ahead

Most Read