A new website will provide a one-stop site that helps users learn about how the climate is changing across the Basin and Boundary. The Columbia Basin Climate Source website—basinclimatesource.ca— was initiated by Columbia Basin Trust and developed by Selkirk College’s Applied Research and Innovation Centre. (Submitted)

Climate change website launched by Selkirk College and Columbia Basin Trust

The site features climate information for communities in the Columbia Basin and boundary region

There’s a new online source for people seeking easy-to-understand information on climate change specific to communities throughout the Columbia Basin and boundary regions.

The Columbia Basin Climate Source website—basinclimatesource.ca— was initiated by Columbia Basin Trust and developed by Selkirk College’s Applied Research and Innovation Centre.

“We’ve spoken extensively with residents and communities and heard they want to learn how to reduce their contributions to greenhouse gas emissions and learn how to adapt to climate change,” said Tim Hicks, trust senior manager, Delivery of Benefits. “We also heard people want more detailed information about how climate change may affect their communities in the coming decades. This website shares that information with great depth and detail.”

Through data, videos, maps and more, the website provides a one-stop site that helps users learn about how the climate is changing across the region (with detailed projections for over 40 climate variables), how this might impact communities, how communities are taking action and how people can use and interpret climate science data.

It’s intended for users of all types, from residents and business owners to community planners and educators to media and local governments.

“In Rossland we understand and see the value in having regionally-specific climate data to help our community,” says Mayor Kathy Moore. “Obviously, climate change affects every community and local government differently. Having this localized information will support and inform our decision-making on everything thing from our day-to-day municipal operations to critically important infrastructure development and asset management. Once again Columbia Basin Trust has recognized and responded to a critical need in our region.”

Kootenay Conservation Program sees the value in this tool.

“This website is a valuable tool for those people wanting to learn more about the impacts of climate change, to envision what our ecosystems will look like and to access these important data,” said Juliet Craig, program manager. “Kootenay Conservation Program is happy to share this tool with our partner organizations and the entire region.”

As part of the College’s Applied Research and Innovation Centre, the Columbia Basin Rural Development Institute brought this website from idea to reality.

“The Columbia Basin Climate Source is a unique tool that focuses on presenting climate data and information at the local and regional level to those who are interested in climate adaptation, climate science and the environment,” said Dr. Adela Tesarek Kincaid, institute lead researcher.

The website is an initiative of the Trust’s Climate Action Program, which also provides funding and other resources to help communities adapt to climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.


 

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