Convicted bank robber testifies in Kalmikoff trial

Andrew Stevenson says he has no memory of the robberies he is convicted of.

Kalmikoff says she didn't know Stevenson was committing robberies

Convicted bank robber Andrew Stevenson appeared Monday in Supreme Court in Nelson as a witness for the defence of Krista Kalmikoff, who is on trial in connection with a spate of West Kootenay robberies in the spring of 2014. Kalmikoff and Stevenson were living together during the period of the robberies.

Kalmikoff’s defence has been based on her contention that she didn’t know Stevenson was committing crimes as she waited for him in the car during the robberies of the Nelson and District Credit Union and the Kootenay Currency Exchange.

Stevenson pled guilty to his part in the robberies earlier this year and is serving a 10-year jail sentence.

In court on Monday, under examination by Kalmikoff’s lawyer, Blair Suffredine, Stevenson said he didn’t tell Kalmikoff, with whom he was living at the time, about the robberies. He also said he didn’t remember the robberies.

“With the amount of drugs I was using, I don’t remember them,” he said. “I didn’t remember one day from another half the time.”

He said that on April 25, the date of the Nelson credit union robbery, he left Kalmikoff to go shopping and asked her to meet him in the parking lot at the Real Canadian Wholesale Club.

“She did not know what I was going to do,” he said.

Stevenson said Kalmikoff didn’t know about the robberies but did know he was buying and selling pills almost daily, which included selling prescription oxycontin to buy street morphine.

Under cross examination by Crown counsel Sunday Patola, Stevenson explained he’d been addicted to morphine and oxycontin since he was a teenager after getting rheumatoid arthritis at age 12, and that during the period of the robberies was injecting 300 millilitres of morphine (prescription and black market pills which he cooked for injection) every day.

His daily routine, he said, was to shop for pills on the street every morning and get high the rest of the day. Stevenson said not only did he not remember the robberies, he had no memory of planning them, of using a sawed-off shotgun, of whether the shotgun was kept in the house, or whether Kalmikoff confronted him about the shotgun which, according to her testimony last week, was kept for some time in the bedroom closet. He didn’t remember when the couple moved from Salmo to Slocan.

He also said he didn’t remember how much money he gained from the robberies or what he spent it on. And he said he remembers neither running back to the car in the parking lot from the robbery nor the subsequent car chase to the Kootenay Canal. He said he has some memory of the police chase once they reached the Kootenay Canal, and of jumping off the bridge to escape the police.

Given his bad memory, Patola wondered how he could be certain that Kalmikoff was unaware of his activities.

“You said she did not know [you were committing robberies], but you really don’t know if she did or not, because of your memory,” Patola charged.

“That is a fair assumption,” Stevenson replied.

“You can’t know what she knew.”

“That’s right.”

Stevenson’s was the final evidence in the trial. Final summations to the jury will take place on Tuesday.

Just Posted

Kootenay Lake’s first marine waste pump-out opens

Sewage facility is located at the Prestige marina

1919: Nelson doctor drowns in Kootenay Lake saving child

And other news from a century ago in the Nelson Daily News

Lily Taylor, Levi Taylor win medals at Ogopogo Open

The local weightlifters were among seven Nelson athletes competing at the event

CHECK THIS OUT: Read B.C.! A roundup of books about our fair province

The Nelson Library’s Anne DeGrace gives us a B.C. Day book list

Nelson Leafs trade goalie Hunter Young to Rockies

Nelson will have an all-new duo between the pipes next season

QUIZ: How much do you remember about Woodstock?

Weekend music festival in Bethel, New York, was held 50 years ago

Advocates ‘internationalize’ the fight to free Raif Badawi from Saudi prison

Raif Badawi was arrested on June 17, 2012, and was later sentenced to 1,000 lashes and 10 years in jail for his online criticism of Saudi clerics

RCMP, search crews hunt for 4-year-old boy missing near Mackenzie

George went missing early Saturday afternoon

Canadian entrepreneurs turning beer byproduct into bread, cookies and profits

Some breweries turn to entrepreneurs looking to turn spent grain into treats for people and their pets

Canada ‘disappointed’ terror suspect’s British citizenship revoked

Jack Letts, who was dubbed “Jihadi Jack” by the U.K. media, has been detained in a Kurdish prison for about two years

Chrystia Freeland condemns violence in Hong Kong, backs right to peaceful assembly

There have been months of protests in the semi-autonomous region

B.C. VIEWS: Log exports and my other errors so far in 2019

Plastic bags, legislature overspending turn out differently

Most Read