Under the Animal Control bylaw, cats are to be treated exactly the same as dogs, in that if they are off their own home property or not leashed, they are considered running-at-large. Barry Coulter file photo

Under the Animal Control bylaw, cats are to be treated exactly the same as dogs, in that if they are off their own home property or not leashed, they are considered running-at-large. Barry Coulter file photo

Cranbrook bylaw concerned about cat antics

If cats are off their home property or not leashed, they are considered running-at-large, City says

It’s 10 p.m. — do you know where your cat is? Possibly causing a stir in the neighbourhood.

The City of Cranbrook has issued a public reminder to the City’s cat owners, saying that many of them do not recognize or know that their feline family member may be out wandering, damaging gardens and other personal property.

Under the Animal Control bylaw, cats are to be treated exactly the same as dogs, in that if they are off their own home property or not leashed, they are considered running-at-large, something the City says all cat owners must be aware of.

“As the City’s bylaw officer, I take so many calls from homeowners frustrated by nuisance cats damaging their gardens, scratching vehicles or spraying on patio furniture,” says Naomi Humenny, Bylaw Officer for the City of Cranbrook. “It shouldn’t be the responsibility of the property owner to find ways to manage the behaviour of cats allowed to roam at large. I am asking all cat owners to please take steps to make sure your cat remains at home and is not allowed to wander the neighbourhood.”

There are also limits to the number of cats and dogs you can have. The Animal Control bylaw sets the maximum number of pets allowed to six, with no more than three dogs or three cats per household. You are encouraged to review the full Animal Control bylaw, by visiting the website and clicking on the Bylaws tab.