Disaster relief: four tips for coping with wildfires, smoky skies

Being shrouded in smoke or having to flee from wildfires can cause anxiety, stress, depression

  • Jun. 24, 2019 11:15 a.m.

Smoke, evacuations, loss, worry –B.C.’s wildfires affect us all. If you are feeling stressed or anxious, you are not alone.

The fear of having to flee your home, leave possessions behind and relocate can cause distress, fear and anxiety for you and your loved ones. Even the prospect of living with smoky skies during wildfire season can cause distress. It is normal to have these types of feelings when experiencing an abnormal situation.

No one can predict when or where a big wildfire will occur, so it’s best to think ahead about how to stay mentally healthy this summer, suggests a news release from Interior Health.

1. Prepare yourself and your family.

Having a clear emergency plan and kit ready for your family, pets and livestock can ease your mind and allow you to focus on other needs. • Visit PreparedBC for resources to help you understand the hazards in your location and then build a family emergency plan. • Visit BCCentre for Disease Control for information on wildfire smoke and steps you can take to protect your health, both indoors and outdoors.

2. Take care of the basics.

Stress takes a toll on our physical and mental health. Try to eat well and get enough sleep. Be kind to yourself. Give and accept support. Follow your daily routine. Take a break from disaster news coverage and from thinking and talking about disaster events.

Read more: No motel refund for Okanagan tourst’s wildfire smoke woes

Read more: A look at B.C. wildfire smoke from space

Read more: B.C. sees 25% jump in inhaler use from wildfire smoke

3. Ask for help.

Whether it’s with family, friends, a doctor or a counsellor – talking helps. Crisis lines are available to listen and help anytime –not just during a crisis. People with moderate to severe symptoms that last more than two to four weeks should consult a family physician, if available. Otherwise, reach out to your nearest Mental Health and Substance Use Centre. Symptoms may include: trouble sleeping and eating; feeling depressed or hopeless; being anxious and fearful; having recurring thoughts or nightmares about the event; and avoiding activities or places that are reminders of the event.

4. Help others.

Check in on older people and children. Coping may be more difficult for older adults living alone, those with mental health challenges, or those with few social supports. Reaching out to connect with them can be a big help. Children who have experienced previous wildfire evacuations or adverse health effects due to smoky skies may need help from adults who provide care for them. The Canadian Mental Health Association provides Mental Health Tips For You and Your Family.

If you are struggling right now, confidential support and crisis lines are available 24/7.

•KUU-US (Nuu-chah-nulth) Indigenous Line at 1-800-558-8717

•Interior BC Crisis Line at 1-888-353-2273

•Provincial Crisis Line1-800-SUICIDE (784-2433)

Visit http://gov.bc.ca/naturaldisasterhealth for more resources to cope with wildfire and natural disaster stress. Community talks, hosted by the Canadian Mental Health Association, will also take place in select communities throughout Interior Health this summer, visit BCDisasterStress.ca for more information.


@SalmonArm
newsroom@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Former Liberal candidate endorses Greens in Kootenay-Columbia

Don Johnston says he’ll be voting for Abra Brynne on Oct. 21

Local champs to step into ring for Fight Night 7

Nelson’s Leah Eberle and Ryan Lewis will have bouts Oct. 19

Officer shot, man arrested after standoff near Argenta

The officer suffered non-life threatening injuries

PLACE NAMES: More Nelson neighbourhoods

Parklands among lost Nelson neighbourhood names

Election 2019: Connie Denesiuk – Liberal Party candidate for South Okanagan – West Kootenay

Connie Denesiuk is running for the Liberal Party in the South Okanagan – West Kootenay riding

Potent power play paces Canucks to 5-1 win over Detroit

Miller nets a pair as Vancouver wins third straight

UPDATE: British couple vacationing in Vancouver detained in U.S. after crossing border

CBP claims individuals were denied travel authorization, crossing was deliberate

After losing two baby boys, B.C. parents hope to cut through the taboo of infant death

Oct. 15 is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day in B.C.

Cheating husband sues mistress for gifted ring after wife learns about affair

The husband gave his mistress $1,000 to buy herself a ring in December 2017

B.C. massage therapist reprimanded, fined for exposing patients’ breasts

Registered massage therapist admits professional misconduct

B.C. boosts legal aid funding in new payment contract

‘Duty counsel’ service restored in some communities, David Eby says

Rugby Canada helps recovery efforts in Japan after typhoon cancels final match

Canadian players wanted to “give back in whatever small way they could”

Alberta to join B.C.’s class-action lawsuit against opioid manufacturers, distributors

B.C. government claims opioids were falsely marketed as less addictive than other pain meds

Most Read