The Regional District of Central Kootenay is dealing with dog issues in Area H.

Dog attack raises control issue in Area H

A woman who was attacked by a dog in Krestova is concerned about lack of dog control in her area.

A woman who was attacked by a dog in Krestova is concerned about lack of dog control in her area of the Regional District of Central Kootenay.

“I cannot over stress how important it is to ensure the future safety and well being of this neighbourhood,” Debra Bakowsky said. “We all need to examine our responsibility as a community and as the stewards and friends of these beautiful animals.”

Bakowsky lives on Sorokin Road and was “viciously attacked without provocation” while riding her bike on the road near her home.

The attack happened on Friday when one of two young Labrador retrievers in the company of a couple boys on bikes took Bakowsky by surprise when it bit her calf and thigh. She had paused to comment on “how cute they were” when she received the first bite and the second came as the dog charged her as she stopped to steady herself up against a tree. The woman ended up with puncture wounds on both legs, very deep on the right.

“In shock, I was taken to hospital by my neighbour,” she said. “It is one thing for dogs to be a nuisance, and quite another to viciously attack without provocation.

“I have realized, living outside of town, that there are many irresponsible dog owners, who besides the nuisance caused by free roaming dogs, do not realize the pack mentality of these animals, and how dangerous they can become.”

Hearing from a friend that this is a “Kootenay phenomenon” doesn’t sit well with Bakowsky. She reported the incident to the RCMP and her regional district director Walter Popoff.

Popoff confirmed that dealing with unruly dogs does happen in Area H where residents have indicated they don’t want control handled by the RDCK. Some areas such as E and F have dog control.

“Dog issues do come up every once in a while,” he said. “My concern is the vicious dogs that attack people and bite people and other animals.”

In the past, Popoff sent out a sample dog control bylaw and the costs associated to having one to homeowners of Area H to gauge interest.

The clear majority of those responding were opposed.

“It’s up to the residents,” he said. “That’s the direction I am getting from residents of the area. If they provide me with different direction, I would work toward establishing a dog control bylaw.”

In light of that consensus, Popoff has engaged in education about animal control and when complaints come his way, he lets people know of other options.

There is a provision in the Community Charter of the province of BC — section 49, that provides permission for a peace officer to obtain a court order to seize a vicious animal, he explained.

Bakowsky would like to see a change in the Area H so residents are protected against vicious dogs. The community charter covering vicious dogs is a cumbersome method of animal control that often leads to an animal being put down rather than rehabilitated.

She understands it’s not likely to have the same degree of rule existing in urban centres.

“I also believe it should be easier to take control of a situation that is potentially dangerous to all concerned, including the animal who is acting out of instinct, lack of training and control by the owner or worse,” she said.

Bakowsky has since met with the “compassionate” owners of the dog who bit her. She’s found them to be “busy parents” who are “wholeheartedly” willing to work on their pet’s behavioural issues.

Just Posted

EDITORIAL: Federal NDP challenges evident on Kootenay campaign trip

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh tours the Kootenays in support of local MPs, proportional representation

Columbia Basin Trust announces grant for technology upgrades

The deadline for organizations to apply is Dec. 17

Leafs fall to Braves, Twitter fight breaks out

Nelson gave up two goals in the third en route to a 4-2 loss

Police receive phone calls about suspicious person soliciting door to door

Police received 50 calls for assistance from November 13 to November 20.

Cardiac arrest survivor saved by passerby

People who know CPR can now register with a new phone app to notify them of nearby emergencies

VIDEO: Two officers of B.C. Legislature escorted out amid investigation

Clerk of the House Craig James, Sergeant-at-arms Gary Lenz on administrative leave

Shirtless stranger loomed over couch and started stabbing, bloody B.C. murder trial hears

Colin John pleads not guilty as trial opens in 2016 Chemainus murder case

Late 2019 too long to wait for ridesharing: B.C. Conservatives

“While the rest of the world is embracing this transportation revolution, B.C. is only now staggering slowly toward legislation on a business model that’s been mainstreamed for over a decade in other jurisdictions.”

Police aim to prevent retaliation after Hells Angel found dead under B.C. bridge

IHIT confirms Chad Wilson, 43, was the victim of a ‘targeted’ homicide

ICBC warns shoppers of the high-accident season at mall parking lots

Over 150,000 accidents happened during the holiday season last year

No deal in sight: Canada Post warns of delivery delays into January

Union holds fifth week of rotating strikes as both sides remain apart on contract negotiations

COLUMN: Higher interest rates will slow B.C. economy after ‘unusually robust’ show

Jock Finlayson is executive vice president and chief policy officer of the Business Council of BC

Jason Aldean, Old Dominion to headline Merritt’s Rockin’ River concerts next summer

Four-day music festival at Coldwater River from Aug. 1 to 4

Police looking into two more incidents at private Toronto all-boys’ school

Police and the school have said two of the prior incidents involved an alleged sexual assault

Most Read