In this Friday, April 12, 2019, photo, a dog sits on an oil rig after being rescued in the Gulf of Thailand. The dog found swimming more than 220 kilometers (135 miles) from shore by an oil rig crew in the Gulf of Thailand was returned safely to land. Vitisak Payalaw, stationed on the rig belonging to Chevron Thailand Exploration and Production, said on his Facebook page the dog was glimpsed Friday swimming towards the platform, where it got a grip on a pole at sea level. (Vitisak Payalaw via AP)

Dog rescued while swimming 135 miles off Thailand

The man who spotted the dog said he’d like to adopt it if no one claimed it

A dog found swimming more than 220 kilometres (135 miles) from shore by workers on an oil rig crew in the Gulf of Thailand has been returned safely to land.

A worker on the rig belonging to Chevron Thailand Exploration and Production, Vitisak Payalaw, said on his Facebook page that they saw the dog last Friday swimming toward the platform. He said they were lucky to spot it because if there had been waves it probably would not have been visible.

The dog made it to the platform, clinging to the support structure below deck without barking or whimpering, Vitisak wrote.

The crew managed to lower a rope and secure it around the dog’s neck and haul it up. Vitisak said they speculated the dog might have fallen off a fishing trawler, and dubbed it “Boon Rod,” or “Survivor.”

The dog was delivered by boat Monday to the southern port of Songkhla and was declared in good shape after being taken to the animal protection group Watchdog Thailand.

Vitisak said if the dog was unclaimed, he would like to take it to his home in northeast Thailand.

READ MORE: ‘Anonymous angel’ finds Kelowna dog stolen from Vancouver car

The Associated Press


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In this Friday, April 12, 2019, photo, a dog is taken care by an oil rig crew after being rescued in the Gulf of Thailand. The dog found swimming more than 220 kilometers (135 miles) from shore by an oil rig crew in the Gulf of Thailand was returned safely to land. Vitisak Payalaw, stationed on the rig belonging to Chevron Thailand Exploration and Production, said on his Facebook page the dog was glimpsed Friday swimming towards the platform, where it got a grip on a pole at sea level. (Vitisak Payalaw via AP)

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