Nelson’s Granite Pointe took a major financial hit in 2017. File photo

Granite Pointe posts $250K loss for 2017

The golf club had an ugly financial year

Granite Pointe’s bottom line suffered a double bogey last year.

The 98-year-old golf course recorded a net loss of $258,418 for the 2017 financial year ending December 31. If amortization of the clubhouse is included, the actual loss is still significant at $181,508.

The poor financial outlook of the course was revealed at its June 27 annual general meeting. Granite Pointe president Barry Auliffe cited several factors for the loss, including losing the first month of the season to inclement weather, several necessary facility upgrades that included a new clubhouse roof, and approximately $30,000 lost on the clubhouse’s restaurant.

“I call it the perfect storm of a combination of mistakes we made plus things we couldn’t control,” said Auliffe.

Auliffe said he regretted the decision to have the non-profit golf course run its own kitchen. Adventure Hotel had run the food and beverage service for four years at Granite Pointe but opted not to renew its contract prior to last season. The board, in turn, decided to try running the restaurant themselves.

“In terms of actual revenue, it didn’t differ significantly from what the Adventure Hotel did,” said Auliffe. “The difference was, they knew what they were doing.”

Related: Granite Pointe opens for the season

Despite the ugly losses, there are silver linings for the struggling course.

Auliffe credited general manager David Belling for increasing Granite Pointe’s membership by 68 new players this season, up to 279, thanks to a two-for-one promotion meant to help pay for the new roof, upgrades to the RV parking lot as well as the purchase of new fuel tanks.

What that’s meant, as of June 26, is a 16 per cent increase to the total rounds played, a 31 per cent jump in cart rentals and a 60 per cent rise in golf shop revenue.

Auliffe said he wasn’t sure if the two-for-one promotion would return next year, but that there would be an emphasis on retaining the course’s new members.

“It has meant a lot more activity around the golf course,” he said. “Because while it’s true that a lot of those new members were people who played and paid green fees last year, they are members this year. … Now that they’re members, they are coming out a lot more.”

The long-term viability of Granite Pointe, however, is still unclear. The course itself has several sections that need upgrading.

“It’s not called Granite Pointe just for something. There’s rock just beneath the surface. …,” said Auliffe.

“There’s some fairways that are extremely rough. They need someone to go at them and level them out so you have a flat lie all the time. Our sand bunkers are not very good and could be much improved. There’s work that could be done on the rough. There’s a couple million dollars of work that could done on that golf course just to turn the user’s improved playability.”

Auliffe said the board was considering its options including selling land for development around the course to help address its debt, which Auliffe said is currently over $1 million. Property owners would pay an annual fee to the course, which Auliffe said is a practice at other golf courses.

Auliffe cautioned, however, that such a plan would likely take decades to carry out.



tyler.harper@nelsonstar.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Interior Health officials outline pandemic response in virtual town hall

Kelowna-Lake County MLA Norm Letnick moderates digital discussion, Q&A with Interior Health leadership

Nelson and COVID-19: everything you need to know

Check this page for every local story related to the outbreak

MP Morrison touts non-partisan effort to provide relief amid COVID-19 pandemic

The federal government has announced a slew of economic initiatives for those impacted by the pandemic

B.C. COVID-19 contact restrictions working, Dr. Bonnie Henry says

’Not out of the woods yet’ as next two weeks are critical

Interior Health to host virtual town hall Friday, March 27

The Q&A forum begins at 6 p.m. PDT, link in story

Experts weigh in on best handling of groceries during COVID-19 pandemic

Study suggests the virus can live for up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to three days on plastic

COVID-19 world update: Enforceable quarantine in NYC?; France orders 1 billion masks

Spain warns EU’s future at stake; New York governor calls Trump’s idea ‘federal declaration of war

B.C. is seeing the highest rate of COVID-19 recovery in Canada, and there’s a few reasons why

British Columbia was one of the first to see rise in COVID-19 cases, and has also switched up testing

Earth Hour 2020 kicks off online Saturday night

Action moves online due to COVID-19

B.C. COVID-19 cases rise 92 to 884, one more death, 81 in care

Outbreak action underway in 12 long-term care homes

B.C. veterinarians want to smooth the fur of COVID-19-worried pet owners

Vets expect to continue giving your fur buddies the help they need while social distancing

B.C. VIEWS: Small businesses need our help

Just as integral in neighbourhoods in Vancouver and Surrey as they are in Prince George or Kelowna

‘Tremendous’ response from blood donors has supply keeping pace with demand

About 400,000 of Canada’s 37 million residents give blood on a regular basis

Most Read