Either the first or second Harrop ferry.

Harrop ferry postcard sells for $64

Our weekly roundup of Kootenaiana on eBay also looks at several noteworthy postcards of the drowned town of Arrowhead.



Part of an ongoing look at items of local interest selling on eBay.

A rare postcard of the Harrop ferry sold for $64 US last month.

It probably dated from the 1930s and showed either the first or second vessel to ply the route. The first, a four-car wooden cable scow, entered service in 1925. It was replaced by another wooden scow in 1937, which was in turn replaced with a steel barge a decade later. A two-lane, 10-car ferry was launched in 1962.

The present Harrop ferry was used at Nelson until the orange bridge was completed in 1957. It was later in service at Robson, then sat idle at Nakusp until 1992, which it was cut apart and assembled for use at Harrop.

• Several nice postcards of Arrowhead have sold recently for significant sums.

Arrowhead was the northern sternwheeler terminus on the Arrow Lakes from 1895 until the SS Minto was taken out of service in 1954. It survived as a community for a few more years but was finally drowned by construction of the Hugh Keenleyside dam.

It was one of West Kootenay’s most evocative towns in that it was about the only one where the main street faced the lake.

The old townsite, now privately owned, is visible from aboard the Galena Bay ferry. Very little is left, but it has a cool old cemetery.

A view of the town in winter, published by H.E. Wallis of Arrowhead and mailed in 1919, sold last week for $103.50 Cdn. (Another copy of this card sold last November for $112.50 US.) Whoever coloured the card airbrushed a set of mountains out to look like water and sky.

The same seller sold another card showing the town from a different angle for $46 Cdn. It had the same sender and recipient as the one above: Gilbert M. to Miss Jones of the Vernon hospital. The message reads: “Hope night duty agrees with you.” It was published by Warwick Bros. and Rutter of Toronto.

A third sepia-toned card titled “View from the mill,” published by Rumsey & Co. of Toronto and mailed from Vancouver to Fernie in 1912 sold for $37 Cdn.

And finally, a card showing a horse-drawn sleigh of enormous logs piled ridiculously high with several men standing on top was snapped up for the buy-it-now price of $8 US.

This story will appear in the West Kootenay Advertiser on October 18.

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